McIntyre: Misrepresenting the stolen emails

McIntyre: Misrepresenting the stolen emails
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DeepClimate has nailed ClimateAudit’s Stephen McIntyre cold  in the clearly intentional misrepresentation of the stolen East Anglia emails.

Thanks to an astute and thorough reading of the emails, DeepC has shown McIntyre running partial quotes from the emails, but carefully deleting sections that show the comments to be made in integrity, good faith and with specific attention to the confusion that may arise from contradictory evidence.

For example, McIntyre reproduced this redacted quote:

“A proxy diagram of temperature change is a clear favourite for the Policy Makers summary. But the current diagram with the tree ring only data [i.e. the Briffa reconstruction] somewhat contradicts the multiproxy curve and dilutes the message rather significantly… This is probably the most important issue to resolve in Chapter 2 at present.. (Folland, Sep 22, 1999, in 0938031546.txt) [sic]”

And DeepC found the whole quote – including the remarkably forthright part that McIntyre cut:

“A proxy diagram of temperature change is a clear favourite for the Policy Makers summary. But the current diagram with the tree ring only data somewhat contradicts the multiproxy curve and dilutes the message rather significantly. We want the truth. Mike thinks it lies nearer his result (which seems in accord with what we know about worldwide mountain glaciers and, less clearly, suspect about solar variations). The tree ring results may still suffer from lack of multicentury time scale variance. This is probably the most important issue to resolve in Chapter 2 at present. [Emphasis added]”

Much has been written about how inappropriate it was for scientists to be withholding data, but consider this: McIntyre was one of the people from whom they were trying to withhold. Presumably they feared that he would act irresponsibly, cutting, pasting and generally misrepresenting their findings to undermine faith in their conclusions.

You can see here, clearly, where they would get that impression.

(With an extra hat tip to DeepC: Nice work.)

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