Greenhouse Gas Emission Policy Revealed as a Sham

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The Globe and Mail offers this report:

The automobile industry may be able to meet a highly touted, voluntary Kyoto agreement to curb greenhouse gas emissions without doing anything extra to improve the fuel efficiency of millions of cars on Canadian roads, a study by a U.S. researcher warns.”

Frequent DeSmogBlog readers will recognize this as the same shameful agreement that we tackled in an earlier post. When the uto industry and the Canadian government first announced this deal in April 2005, we dismissed it as inadequate – in fact, as an example of the misleading approach favored in certain sectors of the auto and energy industries. It turns out, according to research out of the University of California’s Institute of Transportation Studies that the deal is more than inadequate. It may be entirely neutral in its effect.

This isn’t bad merely because government and industry have once again conspired to do nothing about climate change. It’s bad because government and industry demanded credit for this agreement. They stood up together and announced that they were doing something. This research puts the lie to that claim.

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