Seven Signs of Phoney Science

authordefault
on

Thanks to Erin Jeffries for spotting this piece on the seven signs of phoney science.

1. The discoverer pitches the claim directly to the media.

2. The discoverer says that a powerful establishment is trying to suppress his or her work.

3. The scientific effect involved is always at the very limit of detection.

4. Evidence for a discovery is anecdotal.

5. The discoverer says a belief is credible because it has endured for centuries.

6. The discoverer has worked in isolation.

7. The discoverer must propose new laws of nature to explain an observation.

Some of these don’t apply to the climate change “skeptics,” although they often claim that they are standing up against a “powerful establishment” of scientists and governments, all of whom have noticed the obvious.

Some other rules might be:

8. Follow the money. Ask yourself if there is profit to be made in touting one unlikely scientific claim over another.

9. Be wary when someone uses an obvious truth (i.e., “the weather is variable”) to bolster an unsustainable conclusion (“climate change is unpredictable”).


For more on the who’s who of the climate denial industry, check out our comprehensive climate deniers research database.

Related Posts

on

The conference featuring Nigel Farage and Suella Braverman descended into chaos as police were called.

The conference featuring Nigel Farage and Suella Braverman descended into chaos as police were called.
on

Activists aim to make it “politically toxic” for elected representatives to associate with coal, oil and gas companies.

Activists aim to make it “politically toxic” for elected representatives to associate with coal, oil and gas companies.
on

Parliamentary candidate Noel Matthews, who has sacked candidates accused of supporting far-right figures, previously defended the EDL founder.

Parliamentary candidate Noel Matthews, who has sacked candidates accused of supporting far-right figures, previously defended the EDL founder.
on

Lord Agnew is a shareholder in Equinor, the Norwegian oil and gas firm behind the ‘carbon bomb’ Rosebank oil field.

Lord Agnew is a shareholder in Equinor, the Norwegian oil and gas firm behind the ‘carbon bomb’ Rosebank oil field.