The Worst CO2 Polluters in the World

The Worst CO2 Polluters in the World
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Further to an earlier post about Canada’s poor environmental performance, here are some (slightly different) numbers on the top 10 worst CO2 emitting countries in the world. These are from the United Nations 2005 Human Development Report

 The top 10 emitters, on a per capita basis, are:

1. Qatar    53.1  metric tonnes per person per year

2. Trinidad and Tobago 31.9

3. Bahrain 30.6

4. United Arab Emirates 25.1

5. Kuwait 24.6

6. Luxembourg 21.1

7. United States 20.1

8. Australia 18.3

9. Brunei Darussalam 17.7

10. Canada 16.5

Canada’s total CO2 output per year is larger than the top six countries combined. Our performance is worse than Saudi Arabia (15.0) and we are one of fewer than 20 countries in the entire world whose per capita emission rates are in the double digits.

By comparison, China’s annual per capita emission rate is 2.7 metric tonnes. India’s is 1.2. 

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