The Straight Scoop on Hybrid Concerns

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Thanks to our friend Darren for passing along this informative article about seven main concerns about buying a hybrid vehicle.

I’ve listed the concerns below, but you’ll need to click through to read the responses!

  1. Hybrids have complicated technology that is difficult or expensive to fix
  2. Hybrids have limited battery pack life
  3. Hybrids have technical problems like stalling and sputtering
  4. Hybrids do not pay for themselves to justify their premium cost
  5. Hybrids do not offer the driving performance needed
  6. Hybrids will not hold resale value
  7. Hybrids do not get the level of mileage promised

As it turns out, only three of the above concerns are deemed truly “legitimate” – most notably the fact that currently, a normal user can’t really save enough on gas to justify the high price of a hybrid. (There are of course other, more altruistic, reasons to invest in a hybrid.)

If you’ve ever toyed with the idea of buying one, it’s an article worth checking out.

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