Canada's Kyoto Mess

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There’s a great piece by our friend Mitchell Anderson over at The Tyee this week. It’s a look at Canada and our relationship to Kyoto, and what role the oil companies have to play in that… specifically, “a deal quietly penned between Ottawa and Canadian oil industry in 2002 that essentially killed any chance Canada had to meet our obligations under Kyoto agreement.”

There’s a section about the oil sands, also, with a statistic that kind of took my breath away. Namely, that “the oil sands now consume 600 million cubic feet of natural gas per day – enough to heat 3.2 million Canadian homes.” Um… Houston? We have a problem.

As usual at the Tyee, there’s lots of avid debate at the end. Kyoto sure is an issue that gets people going…

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