Imagine if They Called a Global Climate Crisis and Canada Didn't Show Up

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Oh, sorry. Is that not possible?

Gee, Prime Minister Stephen Harper is going to be disappointed. Even more, his apologists at the National Post, who mock much the complaints that Canadian environmentalists have laid against Harper and his hapless Enviro-Minister Rona Ambrose.

Ambrose is the sabatoging president of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), a woman who only goes to COP meetings so she can disrupt the proceedings and undermine any international agreement on action against climate change.

The Post’s Peter Foster takes a shot at the Climate Action Network for the personal nature of its taunt that Ambrose keeps hiding out from the climate conversation: “Hair Today; Gone Tomorrow.”

Foster has a point. There is no reason to invoke questions of Ambrose’s grooming. It should be quite sufficient to complain that Canada has put forth a Minister who is either so thick as to fail to understand the the principal environmental issue of the day, or so lacking in integrity that she is prepared to sacrifice tomorrow’s environment in favour of today’s oil industry profits.

It doesn’t matter what she looks like. It doesn’t even matter that she’s a woman. She’s an international embarrassment – and in that, she is no less than a perfect representative for her boss.

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