Look ma, no bills

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A New Jersey man, funded by a mix of public, private and personal money, has created the first home in the US that generates all of its own electricity through a combination of solar and hydrogen power. Every appliance in his 3000ft house, including his car, is powered through solar panels on the roof of a nearby dwelling on the property and the unused solar power is stored in hydrogen cells for use during solar down times.

All of this resulting in no energy bills. Though the startup and building costs are high for aspiring eco-friendly home owners, the project paints a picture of the scope of renewable energy and how within our reach, implementing eco-friendly energy solutions really are.

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