77 per cent of Canadians convinced global warming is real

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The online survey of about 3,600 people – the largest ever conducted on Canadians and their views on global warming – also found that 30 per cent of respondents believed global warming was the top issue for politicians to address versus 31 per cent who put health care as top priority.

Almost half — 47 per cent — believe climate change will affect their lives and those of future generations, while 42 per cent think it will not significantly affect their lives, but will have an impact on the lives of future generations.

Only 12 per cent of those surveyed viewed global warming as “junk science” and only two per cent believed global warming isn’t happening at all.

The survey was conducted between March 6 and March 19 and has an error margin of 1.6 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

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