Birds in UK struggle to cope with climate change

authordefault
on

The number of birds counted by participants in January’s Big Garden Birdwatch was down, with some breeds hitting a five-year low. RSPB says warmer weather had meant that many birds were able to feed in the countryside and were therefore not visiting garden bird tables as frequently.

Song thrushes were down 65 per cent from last year and blackbird numbers were 25 per cent lower. More than 400,000 people took part in the birdwatch, counting 6.5 million birds.

Ruth Davis, head of climate-change policy at the RSPB, said birds were feeling the impact of climate change and urged everyone to think about how their lives damaged the environment: “As changes to our  climate become more extreme, many birds will struggle to cope with the altered weather patterns.”

Related Posts

on

A UN expert calls for ending confidential arbitration agreements in development and trade treaties, which are forcing nations to roll back climate, enviro, human rights protections while owing fossil fuel companies billions in damages.

A UN expert calls for ending confidential arbitration agreements in development and trade treaties, which are forcing nations to roll back climate, enviro, human rights protections while owing fossil fuel companies billions in damages.
on

Portuguese young people claim their human rights have been violated, while accused countries argue the lawsuit should be thrown out.

Portuguese young people claim their human rights have been violated, while accused countries argue the lawsuit should be thrown out.
on

Emails seen by DeSmog show a PR lobby funded by gas companies is looking to influence the opposition party as likely winners of the next general election.

Emails seen by DeSmog show a PR lobby funded by gas companies is looking to influence the opposition party as likely winners of the next general election.
on

A DeSmog review of 12 large-scale projects reveals a litany of cost-overruns and missed targets, with a net increase in emissions.

A DeSmog review of 12 large-scale projects reveals a litany of cost-overruns and missed targets, with a net increase in emissions.