Nature to newsroom: "Get Me Rewrite!"

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Even diligent readers of the best U.S. newspapers will be left with a less than overwhelming feeling about the dire consequences that may result from global warming, and the firm scientific conclusion that humans have caused warming, according to an analysis in Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting, the media watchdog group.

Counterparts in Britain and elsewhere around the world were much more likely to print headlines and stories that framed global warming as a crisis that must be dealt with quickly to avert disaster.

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