EU, UK carbon-reduction targets questioned, but Britain holds steady

on

UK’s Tony Blair signed up to the EU targets three months before he resigned as prime minister in June. They include a 20% reduction in EU greenhouse gas emissions, compared with 1990 levels, or 30% if other developed nations agree to take similar action.

A spokesman for Blair’s successor, Gordon Brown, said although the EU‘s aims were “ambitious,” UK was “on course to meet” its commitments under the Kyoto Protocol, ratified in 2002. Energy Minister Malcolm Wicks said four to five per cent of electricity comes from renewables and the country is on course for that to be three times as much – 15% – by 2015.

Environmental groups said instead of trying to meet commitments, however, they are trying to avoid them by using nuclear power, which they say is not renewable.

Related Posts

on

A new study adds to a growing body of evidence that fracking represents a “public health crisis,” experts say.

A new study adds to a growing body of evidence that fracking represents a “public health crisis,” experts say.
on

Cheniere Energy has introduced “cargo emissions tags” to assuage climate concerns of potential buyers. But a new report says these tags are riddled with problems.

Cheniere Energy has introduced “cargo emissions tags” to assuage climate concerns of potential buyers. But a new report says these tags are riddled with problems.
Opinion
on

Anti-science rhetoric and special interests have pushed us to the edge of climate chaos. But just as quantum physics disrupted our view of matter and energy, quantum social change disrupts our beliefs about what’s possible, how fast, and by whom.

Anti-science rhetoric and special interests have pushed us to the edge of climate chaos. But just as quantum physics disrupted our view of matter and energy, quantum social change disrupts our beliefs about what’s possible, how fast, and by whom.
on

Climate campaigners are concerned over Jane Toogood’s role in a company that sells technology to produce hydrogen from methane.

Climate campaigners are concerned over Jane Toogood’s role in a company that sells technology to produce hydrogen from methane.