UK Tory group plugs tax rebate for cutting energy use

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The party’s Quality of Life policy group put forward a broad range of proposals based on the premise that green renovations should earn cash back. The measures include council-tax and VAT cuts, and limits on the energy use of appliances like TVs and fridges.

Chaired by ex-environment secretary John Gummer and prospective Tory MP Zac Goldsmith – the group says household goods that exceed energy limits should be banned from sale in UK.

Products with lights that stay on permanently should also be outlawed, and a labeling system be introduced to help consumers compare the energy usage of electrical products.

“To upgrade your home is always going to be a disruptive process,” Goldsmith said, “so the best time to do that is at the point where it changes ownership.”

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