WHO traces rise in malaria cases, other health threats, to global warming

WHO traces rise in malaria cases, other health threats, to global warming
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The World Health Organization says global warming has led to larger mosquito populations, making Dengue, malaria and other vector-borne diseases very difficult to control. As warm zones spread, malaria transmission is extending to areas never seen before.

Higher temperatures will also dry up arable land, causing widespread malnutrition, and put densely populated areas at risk of deadly flooding and contamination of food and water supplies.

As a result, global warming is going on the WHO agenda, probably in 2008 after more research, which will probably be put to use in programs urging governments to cut back on fossil fuel consumption and stop destroying the region’s rainforests – two of the biggest factors in climate change.

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