Snarling Cyclones; Goofy Journalism

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The Washington Indpendent reports that a new study suggests climate change may generate fewer, but wetter and more devastating hurricanes. The Independent also notes that this contradicts earlier studies suggesting that global warming may generate more hurricanes that would, again, be wetter and more intense.

The author, Suemedha Sood, then arrives at this stunning conclusion:

“The takeaway point is that we shouldn’t be so quick to point fingers at global warming. The science isn’t [all] in yet.”

So, the smartest scientists in the world are arguing about whether there will be more hurricanes or fewer, but they agree that, either way, they’re going to be stronger and more dangerous, and the Washington Independent decides that means we should ignore climate change until “all” the science is in.

For the record, the Independent is a creature of the Centre for Independent Media, which purportedly has a “progressive” bent. So we can’t blame this silliness on oily self-interest or on ideological blindness – which leaves me, frankly, at a loss …

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