Poznan: Canada Snags Another Fossil of the Day

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Canada distinguished itself for poor performance again today by forcing the United Nations Secretariat to dismantle a tar sands display mounted by the Canadian Youth Climate Coalition.

The display consisted of four roughly three-foot by two-foot tar sands photos, accompanied by a small amount of explanatory (and not very controversial) type. The pictures were tacked to a Climate Action Network booth in the main conference hall at the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change meeting in Poznan.

In awarding Canada the (not-very) coveted Fossil, youth delegate Katherine Trajan sang the following, to the tune of “My Heart Will Go On,” perhaps appropriately from “The Titanic.”

Canada keeps blocking
Objecting, obstructing
Hoping that the talks won’t go on

We object to targets
Commitments, and funding
We wish that Kyoto were gone

Stop, no, we don’t want to go
To a world where our tar sands are banned
We love to burn fossil fuels
And we’ll keep on emitting
Emitting till Harper is gone 


Richard Littlemore is in Poznan reporting for DeSmoglog. He is the first blogger to be ever given full media credentials by the United Nations.

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