Video of Keystone XL Tar Sands Protesters Arrested At The White House

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Usually the best way to solve a neighborly spat is to march right up to the door and talk it out, face-to-face. However, if said neighbor happens to be away a lot and has rooftop snipers protecting the property, Plan B may be in order: shouting through the fence.

That’s why for two weeks over 1250 people got arrested in front of the White House in an attempt to show President Obama that putting a leaky, oily pipeline through their collective backyards is not a very neighborly thing to do. Each day of the protest averaged between 50-100 arrests, steadily increasing until the 14th (and last) day when 244 people were arrested, resulting in the largest act of civil disobedience yet for the climate movement.

Participants protesting the Keystone XL pipeline spanned a wide range of ages, occupations, and origins: including those from the heartland of the Midwest where the pipeline is set to run through, and indigenous and frontline communities situated near the tar sands in Canada.

According to organizers, this is Phase 1 of the campaign, with Phase 2 coming up quickly behind in early October. President Obama will supposedly decide the fate of the pipeline in approximately 90 days, and in the meantime people have been encouraged to give his campaign offices a friendly visit.

Watch the video below for a look at the last day of the arrests in DC:

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