The Carbon Bubble Explained In A Way Even City Investors Can Understand…

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The concepts of a ‘carbon bubble’ and ‘stranded assets’ may seem devilishly complex even for City slickers.

But the non-profit financial think tank Carbon Tracker has today released a video explaining the risks faced by investors in a way that a particularly astute child might well understand.

The film, Fossil Fuel: A Risky Business, was released on YouTube with the following statement: “The fossil fuel industry is inflating a ‘carbon bubble’ based on risky demand and price assumptions.

“Already under current climate policy settings, companies risk wasting over $1 trillion over the next decade. 

“If the policy settings are ratcheted up ‎to reflect a two-degrees target then the amount at risk rise dramatically to $20 trillion plus. Did you know that your money could be at risk too?”

We can only assume the production was made with recycled paper. 

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