Listen to the Drilled Podcast on Climate Denial

You thought you knew the story of climate denial, but what about its connection to cigarette filter tips or public broadcasting? Listen to the Drilled podcast and you’ll learn fascinating new details about the propaganda campaign of the century: the creation of climate denial.

The investigative podcast is independently reported by climate journalist Amy Westervelt. Featuring interviews with former Exxon scientists, season one traces the corporate-funded campaign to spread doubt about global warming.

Season two follows a group of West Coast crab fishermen who are experiencing firsthand the impacts of climate change they became the first industry to sue the oil industry over this.

Meanwhile, season three digs into the history of fossil fuel propaganda and the “mad men” who pioneered its public relations campaigns.

As Robert Brulle, environmental sociology researcher at Brown University, told Westervelt: “The oil companies … were really the beginners, and probably the greatest institutionalized effort, at developing corporate propaganda to support their industry.”

Season four is expected to air this coming January, so that gives you plenty of time to catch up now. Check out all the Drilled episodes and their transcripts.

Listen to the Drilled Podcast on Climate Denial

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