The Overwrought Hyperbole Institute

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The gassy Competitve Enterprise Institute has reacted in horror to President George W. Bush’s State of the Union admission that the United States is “addicted to oil.”

The CEI‘s Director of Energy Policy, Myron Ebell (the Oil-aholics Anonymous equivalent to an old drinking buddy), said in a post on the CEI site,

“President Bush might as well have said, ‘we’re addicted to prosperity, comfort, and mobility, and I’ve got the policies to do something about it.’”

It wasn’t just that President Bush was proposing to look at alternative energy sources, Ebell said:

“President Bush also seems to have forgotten the positive energy policies (my emphasis) that he has promoted in the past. These include removing the political and legal obstacles to exploiting America’s vast conventional energy resources, such as opening portions of the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge and the Outer Continental Shelf to oil and gas development.”

Well, we know where Myron stands. And that being the case, it’s a pleasure to see President Bush edging a little further away.


For more on the who’s who of the climate denial industry, check out our comprehensive climate deniers research database.

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