Treehugger Ix-nays Carbon Sequestration

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Treehugger has a good post today about carbon sequstration and why it’s not all that it’s cracked up to be. Drawing heavily on Tim Flannery’s book, The Weather Makers, they argue that

All this talk of carbon sequestration can basically be seen as a delaying tactic, as a way to get government support and to keep the operation and construction of coal power plants more socially acceptable. It’s the equivalent of saying: “Don’t bother us, we’re working on it!”

Furthermore, they suggest,

As a society civilization species, we must back the right horse and stop being misled by the coal industry’s delaying tactics. There’s a big opportunity cost in time and resources to going down the wrong path. Each new power plant big coal builds means decades of fat profit for it, but for the rest of us here on Earth, it’s just bad, bad news.

Check it out and decide for yourself.

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