DeSmog

If We Can't Trust Pat Michaels, Who Can We Trust?

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An article in the Charlottesville (Virginia) Daily Progress indicates that Pat Michaels, whose claim to fame is that he is the Virginia State Climatologist, might just be much less than he would have us believe. 

According to the article:

“It may be an inconvenient truth for some that Patrick J. Michaels, Virginia’s state climatologist, is not subject to gubernatorial appointment – or political removal from office.” and, “Michaels, whose utility industry funding and controversial views on global warming often spark controversy, holds an honorary position and does not speak for the state or the governor, according to Gov. Timothy M. Kaine’s office.”

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