Melbourne Age: Damned When Praise is Faint

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IPA's Alan MoranAs if in punishment for an idle compliment that I posted only yesterday, the usually reputable Australian daily, the Melbourne Age, embarrasses itself today with a piece by Alan Moran, director of the Australian Institute of Public Affairs (IPA) deregulation unit.
We have written before on the IPA‘s status as a mining and energy industry front group. The Age, like so many credulous newspapers, should be ashamed of itself for publishing this kind of confusing and scientifically suspect material from industry backed lobbyists who are presenting themselves as climate change experts.
If Moran had the good grace to say: “My clients in the energy industry would prefer the government continue to support the burning of coal over what we see as a risky adventure of supporting higher-cost alternatives,” you could hardly blame him. But he’s not owning his bias, which makes everything he says suspect – if not entirely silly.

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