DeSmog

Morano vs Revkin – Ready to Face Off!

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While the SEJ Conference is packed with people and sessions that sound interesting, we’re most looking forward to Friday night’s session just pre-dinner – “And Now a Word from Our Critics.” This session, hosted by Christy George, will feature four speakers: Bill Blakemore, Dan Fagin, Marc Morano, and Andrew Revkin.

Marc Morano, as many of you may know, is a staffer for Senator Inhofe in all his current notoriety. Andrew Revkin is a long-time environment writer for the New York Times. It’ll be interesting to see what Morano says, and equally interesting to see how his spin is received by the audience of environmental journalists.

The DeSmogBlog will be liveblogging from the session, reporting out on all the action. We’ll also be posting a raw audio recording of the debate – so stay tuned to the site for that.

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