DeSmog

Suzuki (the Car Company): Idiocy on Wheels

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Suzuki XL7Although by no means the worst offender among the car companies, Suzuki deserves its share of ridicule for the way it promotes its big-car line. In a glossy flyer in the Globe and Mail today, Suzuki pitches its new SUV with a slogan that goes:

“X is for extra space to breathe, to think or to do as you please.”

Wouldn’t it be nice if these guys had the tiniest sense of irony? X is clearly for extra pollution for other people to breathe, for thinking that your own appetites are justifiable (if necessary, for thinking that climate change is not your problem) and for doing as you please, regardless of the costs to others.

The new Suzuki, apparently, is for Hummerheads on a tight budget.

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