DeSmog

Corporate honchos acknowledge global warming but falter on emission cuts

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The Business Roundtable, while it took no stand on mandatory regulation of greenhouse-gas emissions, did call for a national inventory to encourage voluntary reductions from individual companies.

It also agreed to encourage energy efficiency to reduce electricity use by 25%, and development of new technologies that emit little or no greenhouse gases, relative to current technologies.

The group further suggested working with other countries to adopt a global solution that includes reduction of deforestation in the tropics.

In concluding, the CEO’s said “U.S. leadership in establishing this global framework is essential.”

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