Oreskes, Conway exposing the Merchants of Doubt

Oreskes, Conway exposing the Merchants of Doubt
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Naomi Oreskes,  professor of history and science studies at the University of California, San Diego, and Erik Conway, an historian at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab are stumping about these days in support of their excellent new book, Merchants of Doubt.

As you might expect from someone with Oreskes’ exemplary background, Merchants is a painstakingly careful review of the climate change denial campaign. She and Conway have traced the whole, odious action back to the late 1980s and the early work of the George C. Marshall Institute, which they aregue convincingly was ground zero for the denial industry.

For a taste quick taste of their position, check this CNN feature.

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