Mayor Calvin Tillman Leaves Dish, Texas Fearing 'Fracking' Effects On Family's Health

Mayor Calvin Tillman Leaves Dish, Texas Fearing 'Fracking' Effects On Family's Health
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Fearing for his children’s health, Mayor Calvin Tillman is leaving behind his government position and getting out of Dodge… or rather, Dish. Dish, Texas is a town consisting of 200 residents and 60 gas wells.

When Tillman’s sons repeatedly woke up in the middle of the night with mysterious nosebleeds, he knew it was time to move – even if it meant leaving his community behind.

In an exclusive interview with The Huffington Post, Mayor Tillman reveals that when it came down to family or politics, the choice wasn’t a tough one to make.

Read more at The Huffington Post.

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