Nature Scolds GMU over Wegman Inquiry

Nature Scolds GMU over Wegman Inquiry
on

George Mason U dragging its feet on plagiarism complaint

An editorial in the current issue of Nature questions why George Mason University has taken more than 14 months – so far – in its review of the plagiarism complaint against Edward Wegman, even though GMU’s own policy says that such a complaint should be dealt with in 12 weeks.

“Long misconduct investigations do not serve anyone, except perhaps university public-relations departments that might hope everyone will have forgotten about a case by the time it wraps up,” the Nature editorial states.

The editors go on to say that this is as particularly pressing issue because Wegman’s (purportedly) shoddy work has been used to prop up government policy, as well as to dilute the quality of climate science.

Finally Nature says this:

“Perhaps it should fall to accreditation agencies to push for speedy investigations. Tom Benberg, vice-president of the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools — the agency that accredits George Mason University — says that his agency might investigate if the university repeatedly ignored its own policies on the timing of misconduct inquiries. To get the ball rolling, he says, someone would have to file a well-documented complaint.”

Gee, that sounds exactly like an invitation …

Related Posts

on

A new report catalogues 15,896 federal and state violations from more than 100 U.S. Chamber of Commerce members, including major fossil fuel companies.

A new report catalogues 15,896 federal and state violations from more than 100 U.S. Chamber of Commerce members, including major fossil fuel companies.
on

“Most companies and financial institutions with the greatest ability to halt deforestation are doing little or nothing,” said Niki Mardas, Executive Director at Global Canopy, which conducted the research.

“Most companies and financial institutions with the greatest ability to halt deforestation are doing little or nothing,” said Niki Mardas, Executive Director at Global Canopy, which conducted the research.
Analysis
on

Two research psychologists analyze the all-too-familiar aspects of climate science denial found in the blockbuster new film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence.

Two research psychologists analyze the all-too-familiar aspects of climate science denial found in the blockbuster new film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence.
on

An Oregon State University study of almost 3 million births in Texas found mothers living less than a mile from drilling sites were more likely to experience higher blood pressure and other potentially dangerous health conditions.

An Oregon State University study of almost 3 million births in Texas found mothers living less than a mile from drilling sites were more likely to experience higher blood pressure and other potentially dangerous health conditions.