EnergyNOW! Tackles Keystone XL, And Talks To Me About Pipelines

EnergyNOW! Tackles Keystone XL, And Talks To Me About Pipelines
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On Sunday, energyNOW! news tackled the Keystone XL debate in a wide-ranging half hour program that covered the controversial pipeline in typically comprehensive fashion.

An overview intro segment looks at the “impact on America,” from the alleged reduction of imports of OPEC crude to potential for pollution. Reporter Thalia Assuras’ trip to Nebraska to talk to local ‘Huskers – landowners and politicians alike – is fascinating.

The show then travels up to Alberta, whose Athabasca tar sands reserves would feed the Keystone XL pipeline, funneling filthy DilBit crude down to Gulf Coast refineries.

The last segment features an exclusive interview with Energy Secretary Steven Chu, which they teased a few weeks back. (And which, you might recall, I responded to at the time, calling his claim that Keystone XL would increase our national “energy security” cynical politics.)

If you’re able to spend a half hour learning about this urgent hot-button issue, this show is a great place to start. If you can’t see the embedded video below, you can watch on energyNOW’s website.

As a supplement to their Keystone XL program, and part of their ongoing Reporter’s Notebook series, yours truly sat down and talked to energyNOW! about energy pipelines in general. If you’ve been reading my ongoing series about energy pipelines, you’ve likely heard most of this. But you haven’t seen me talk about it awkwardly into a webcam!

EnergyNOW! Tackles Keystone XL, And Talks To Me About Pipelines
Ben Jervey is a Senior Fellow for DeSmog and directs the KochvsClean.com project. He is a freelance writer, editor, and researcher, specializing in climate change and energy systems and policy. Ben is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for Energy and the Environment at Vermont Law School. He was the original Environment Editor for GOOD Magazine, and wrote a longstanding weekly column titled “The New Ideal: Building the clean energy economy of the 21st Century and avoiding the worst fates of climate change.” He has also contributed regularly to National Geographic News, Grist, and OnEarth Magazine. He has published three books—on eco-friendly living in New York City, an Energy 101 primer, and, most recently, “The Electric Battery: Charging Forward to a Low Carbon Future.” He graduated with a BA in Environmental Studies from Middlebury College, and earned a Master’s in Energy Regulation and Law at Vermont Law School. A bicycle enthusiast, Ben has ridden across the United States and through much of Europe.

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