Extinction Rebellion Co-Founder Goes on Trial for Breaking Window

Gail Bradbrook could face a custodial sentence if convicted.
Matt Portrait by Kate Holt
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Gail Bradbrook, a co-founder of Extinction Rebellion, attends a hearing at Isleworth Crown Court in west London. Credit: Gareth Morris/Extinction Rebellion.

Gail Bradbrook, a co-founder of Extinction Rebellion, went on trial in west London on Monday for breaking a window at the Department of Transport in October, 2019.

Bradbrook has previously pleaded not guilty to a charge of criminal damage for using a hammer and woodworking tool to crack the building’s glass frontage, which the prosecution valued at £27,500.

Bradbrook could face a prison sentence if convicted. Judges can also impose community service and fines.

Extinction Rebellion emerged in 2018, aiming to use civil disobedience to force governments to take rapid action to prevent climate breakdown and ecosystem collapse.

The group has since mobilised protests in the UK and around the world, including in April this year, when it linked up with other environmental and social justice organisations to mobilise tens of thousands of people in central London.

The trial at Isleworth Crown Court is due to conclude on Friday.

Matt Portrait by Kate Holt
Matthew is global investigations editor at DeSmog, leading coverage of the global climate crisis, energy politics, and the struggles for environmental justice through an international lens. He has previously worked at Reuters and the Financial Times, and writes the Resonant World newsletter exploring connections between the climate crisis and collective trauma.

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