CropLife Europe (formerly European Crop Protection Association)

Background

CropLife Europe is a trade association representing the agrichemical industry in Europe. Its corporate members include Adama, BASF, Bayer Crop Science, Corteva Agriscience, FMC, Syngenta, and UPL.1Our Network,” European Crop Protection Association. Archived November 11, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/GbKte

The organization was known as the European Crop Protection Association (ECPA) until January 2021, when it rebranded to CropLife Europe. Announcing the name change, CropLife Europe Director General Géraldine Kutas said in a statement that sustainable food models were “best achieved through a holistic approach, so an agile association representing a host of technologies under one roof will be better equipped to represent the integrated solutions needed to deliver sustainable agriculture and respond to the rapidly changing demands from society and evolving policy frameworks.”2“ECPA becomes CropLife Europe”, Eurofruit,  January 8, 2021. Archived January 19, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/JdP4g

CropLife Europe is a member association of CropLife International, a trade association for the world’s main agrochemical and agricultural biotech companies that describes itself as “the voice of the global plant science industry”.3Members,” CropLife International. Archived December 2, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/PfPk0 4About,” CropLife International. Archived November 7, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/NEThO 

CropLife Europe states that it promotes “modern farming practices and champions the use of crop protection technology important for the sustainable intensification of agriculture.”5About us,” CropLife Europe. Archived November 23, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/74BvE 

CropLife Europe states that it “represents sustainable crop protection solutions” that are “innovative and science-based” and “contribute to providing Europeans with a safe, affordable, healthy, and sustainable food supply”.

It also states that it “promote[s] modern farming practices and champion[s] the use of innovation and technology for a more sustainable model of agriculture.”6About us,” CropLife Europe. Archived November 23, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/74BvE 

On its website, CropLife Europe provides information on t7he production of counterfeit and illegal pesticides and states that “increasing quantities of fake pesticides are being produced, marketed and sold by criminals around the world.”Illegal Pesticides,” CropLife Europe. Archived August 12, 2021. Archive URL :https://archive.ph/L5AAR 

In 2014, CropLife Europe, then ECPA, developed a social media campaign to raise awareness among farmers about illegal and counterfeit pesticides across Europe. The campaign was a collaboration with authorities from 35 countries, the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO), the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF), and the European Commission’s DG Sante.8Anti Counterfeit Campaign,” YouTube playlist by user CropLife Europe. Last updated October 2, 2014. Archived November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/yycwl 

In 2020, Le Monde reported that scientists and NGOs were concerned after the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), signed a “letter of intent” formalizing a strategic alliance with CropLife International.9Le rapprochement entre la FAO et le lobby des pesticides inquiète scientifiques et ONG,” Le Monde, November 20, 2020. Archived November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/HQ9hv 10CropLife International and FAO Agree to New Strategic Partnership,” CropLife International, October 20,2020. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/cUeDk Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog. Over 300 scientists signed a letter urging the Director-General of FAO, Qu Dongyu, to withdraw the partnership proposal and to instead “renew and strengthen FAO’s commitment to an agroecological transformation of our food and farming systems and to the reduction of reliance on hazardous chemical pesticides and those technologies designed to perpetuate their use.”11Letter from academics, scientists & researchers expressing concern regarding FAO’s announcement of plans to forge a new st,” Pesticide Action Network, November 19, 2020. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

In October 2021, CropLife Europe elected Olivier de Matos as its new director general. On his appointment, de Matos stated:12Croplife Europe has a new DG,“ CropLife Europe, October 1, 2021. Archived November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/xCcmx

“I am delighted to represent a sector that is working hard to address global challenges such as climate change and food security in a sustainable way. With our 2030 Commitments we, Croplife Europe and its members, will continue to drive change and contribute to the ambitious objectives of the European Green Deal.”

Following de Matos’ election, Politico Europe reported that CropLife Europe’s former Director General, Géraldine Kutas, had joined global animal health company Ceva as the executive vice-president of corporate affairs and communication.13POLITICO EU Influence: EU watchdog eyes revolving door — NGOs want Hungary’s funds withheld — Deregulating the financial markets,” Politico Europe, October 1, 2021. Archived on November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/ApGRa

Stance on Climate Change

CropLife Europe runs a campaign called “More With Less,” which calls for more innovation in agriculture and precision farming to improve crop yields and efficiency. CropLife Europe says that a challenge for farmers is producing “the high-quality, safe, and affordable foods that consumers demand,” while also “protecting and using less of the earth’s valuable – and limited – natural resources.”“14More with Less,” YouTube video uploaded by user CropLife Europe on April 9, 2020. Archived .mp4 on file at DeSmog.


Read more: Digital and Precision Agriculture – Criticisms and Concerns


CropLife Europe encourages farmers to use no-till practices as they “[moderate] the effects of climate change.” The group states that “certain crop protection products” can assist with no-till practices by reducing the need to plough or till the soil, preventing soil erosion and preserving biodiversity. CropLife Europe argues that farmers need pesticides, including glyphosate, in order to use regenerative agriculture practices such as no-till.15Fertile & healthy soil is essential for agriculture & a sustainable #foodsupply. Certain #cropprotection products help reduce the need to plough or till, preventing soil erosion & preserving soil biodiversity. #Notill also moderates the effects of climate,” Tweet by user @cropprotection, August 9, 2019. Retrieved from Twitter.com. Archived .png on file at DeSmog.

“Soil is an important carbon sink that stores 10% of the world’s CO2. When soil is tilled, CO2 is released and contributes to global warming. Crop protection products enable farmers to use sustainable practices such as no-till, keeping carbon in the soil,” CropLife Europe tweeted in March 2020.”16Soil is an important carbon sink that stores 10% of the world’s CO2. When soil is tilled, CO2 is released and contributes to global warming. Crop protection products enable farmers to use sustainable practices such as no-till, keeping carbon in the soil.#PreparingTheGround,” Tweet by user @cropprotection, March 9, 2020. Retrieved from Twitter.com. Archived .png on file at DeSmog.

Croplife Europe contends that pesticides “facilitate” conservation tillage as a more sustainable technique for farmers to use in “preventing soil erosion & increasing carbon sequestration.”17“#Pesticides facilitate conservation tillage, a more sustainable #farming technique preventing soil erosion & increasing carbon sequestration. #WithOrWithout,” Tweet by @cropprotection, April 18, 2018. Retrieved from Twitter.com. Archived .png on file at DeSmog.


Read more: Regenerative Agriculture – Criticisms and Concerns


In 2018 the EU approved a ban on neonicotinoid agricultural pesticides.18Damian Carrington. “EU agrees total ban on bee-harming pesticides,” The Guardian, April 27, 2018. Archived November 9, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/lutrO In 2018, CropLife Europe, then the ECPA, argued that the neonicotinoid ban in Europe was affecting harvests and biodiversity, and increasing greenhouse gas emissions. The group also published an infographic, using data from a paper by scientific consultants HFFA, on the economic and environmental costs of banning neonicotinoids in the European Union. The infographic stated that banning the pesticide results in additional greenhouse gas emissions, along with increasing land use and water consumption. It stated that the research paper was financed by Bayer Division Crop Science and Syngenta.19Neonicotinoid ban hits farmers and the environment,” European Crop Protection Association. Archived November 11, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/MPotb. Archived .pdf of infographic on file at DeSmog.

In a September 2020 press release announcing the group’s 2030 commitments to support the European Green Deal, ECPA Director General Géraldine Kutas said, “We are serious about contributing and aligning with the Green Deal policy initiatives which is why our companies have joined together to set our own voluntary, sector-specific, measurable goals in their support.”20Europe’s crop protection industry makes 2030 Commitments,” CropLife Europe, September, 7, 2020. Archived November 30, 2021, Archive URL: https://archive.ph/1d94Q 

The group’s stated list of goals includes “invest[ing] 10 billion euros into innovation in precision and digital technologies by 2030,” in addition to €4 billion for “innovation in biopesticides” to develop targeted methods of protecting crops that would have less environmental impact.212030 Commitments,” CropLife Europe, September 7, 2020. Archived November 27, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/LUs7v Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Genetically Modified Organisms 

Gene editing in agriculture is the process of adding, enhancing or removing specific traits from the DNA of an organism.22Nicholas G. Karavolias, Wilson Horner, Modesta N. Abugu, and Sarah N. Evanega. “Application of Gene Editing for Climate Change in Agriculture,” Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, September 7, 2021. Archived November 4, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/kZlE6 Genetic modification can make organisms more resistant to certain environmental conditions, including pests, chemicals, diseases and weather. While some scientists and industry representatives argue that the more widespread use of gene editing techniques will lead to significant environmental benefits, others have claimed there are “potentially harmful” consequences associated with their use.23Press Release: Products of new GM techniques should be strictly regulated as GMOs,” European Network of Scientists for Social and Environmental Responsibility (ENSSER), December 2017. Archived December 6, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/sL2XW 

Certain studies suggest that the adoption of  genetically modified insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant technology has reduced pesticide spraying, decreasing the environmental impact associated with herbicide and insecticide use on these crops.24Graham Brookes and Simon Barfoot. “Environmental impacts of genetically modified (GM) crop use 1996-2016: Impacts on pesticide use and carbon emissions,” GM Crops & Food, Archived April 16, 2020. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog. However, other studies suggest that weeds become more resistant, leading farmers to use additional chemicals, in larger quantities.25Caroline Newman. “Largest-Ever Study Reveals Environmental Impact of Genetically Modified Crops,” UVATODAY, September 14, 2016. Archived October 29, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/BAPXC 

Most studies conclude that there is still not enough data in order to assess the long term safety of such new crops, nor their environmental impact.26Aristidis M. Tsatsakis, Muhammad Amjad Nawaz, Demetrios Kouretas, Georgios Balias, Kai Savolainen, Victor A. Tutelyan, Kirill S. Golokhvast, Jeong Dong Lee, Seung Hwan Yang, Gyuhwa Chung. “Environmental impacts of genetically modified plants: A review,” Environmental Research, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2017.03.011.

In September 2021, CropLife Europe published a position paper on GMOs.27CropLife Europe’s Position Paper on the use of New Genomic Techniques in plants,” CropLife Europe, September 7,2021. Archived on November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/lAEux The paper stated that GMOs have the “potential to contribute to sustainable agri-food systems, in line with the Green Deal objectives” by “accelerating the development of resilient plant varieties for sustainable food production.”28Position Paper on the use of New Genomic Techniques,” CropLife Europe, September 7, 2021. Archived on .pdf at DeSmog.

Role in Pesticides Controversy

According to the EU Transparency Register, in 2019 CropLife Europe, then the ECPA, spent €410,000 running a “communication campaign which explains the benefits of pesticides” called ‘#WithOrWithout’.  The campaign argued for continued authorization of glyphosate using the hashtag #glyphosateisvital.29European Crop Protection Association,” EU Transparency Register. Archived November 11, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/G6OWL In a 2017 tweet, ECPA stated that “glyphosate helps reduce CO2 emissions, minimise soil erosion & improve soil quality.”30Consider the facts: #Glyphosate helps reduce CO2 emissions, minimise soil erosion & improve soil quality #WithorWithout #glyphosateisvital,” Tweet by user @cropprotection, October 4, 2017. Retrieved from Twitter.com. Archived .png on file at DeSmog.

Glyphosate is the world’s most widely used weed killer.31Glyphosate,” Pesticide Action Network. Archived November 9, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/AparD The International Agency for Research on Cancer stated in 2015 that glyphosate “probably carcinogenic to humans.” The EU re-approved glyphosate 2017.32Arthur Neslen. “Controversial glyphosate weedkiller wins new five-year lease in Europe,” The Guardian, November 27, 2020. Archived November 9, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/ivFY7 In January 2020, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a statement stating the agency had concluded that “there are no risks of concern to human health when glyphosate is used according to the label and that it is not a carcinogen.”33EPA Finalises Glyphosate Mitigation,” US Environmental Protection Agency, January 30. 2020. Archived November 9, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/iyvPB

Responding to European Parliament votes on two own-initiative reports in 2016, “Technological solutions for sustainable agriculture” from Conservative Member Anthea McIntyre, and “Enhancing innovation and economic development in future European farm management” from Renew Europe Member Jan Huitema, ECPA said that “pesticides and other plant science innovations boost crop yields, minimise pre-and post-harvest losses and improve the efficient use of natural resources such as land, water and energy.”34Parliament calls for technological and innovative solutions for farming,” European Crop Protection Association. Archived November 11, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/gSy3t

According to a 2017 report from the NGO Corporate Europe Observatory, European Parliament members were invited by the Irish Farmers Association and the British Farm Bureau “in partnership with the European Crop Protection Association (ECPA)” to “discuss the possible impact of what a ban on Glyphosate could mean for EU agriculture sector.”35Last minute pro-Roundup lobbying ahead of high-level #MonsantoPapers hearing,” Corporate Europe, October 9, 2017. Archived November 11, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/T4uBQ

CropLife Europe was a stakeholder in the European Commission’s series of consultation events on the sustainable use of pesticides directive (SUP),36Environmental and Impact Assessment,European Commission. Archived November 30,2021.  Archive URL: https://archive.ph/5V2eq which “aims to achieve a sustainable use of pesticides in the EU by reducing the risks and impacts of pesticide use.”37Sustainable Use of Pesticides,” European Commission. Archived November 30,2021.  Archive URL: https://archive.ph/EEAFF In a presentation during the first stakeholders meeting in January 2021, CropLife Europe stated that “to tackle an increasing range of pests and diseases, pesticides and biopesticides are both essential elements in the toolbox” of the European Integrated Pest Management plan.38Evaluation and Revision of the SUD: The Crop Protection Industry Perspective,” CropLife Europe, January 18, 2021. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

In the same presentation, CropLife Europe wrote, “Any [pesticide] reduction targets must be practical, science based and preceded by a comprehensive and holistic impact assessment.” 

In April 2020, CropLife Europe published a report it had commissioned from Steward Redqueen, a strategy consultancy that “focuses on integrating sustainability.”39Low Yield II Report,” CropLife Europe, April 21, 2020. Archived January 19, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/dcTQb The report claimed the EU’s decision to remove certain “critical pesticide active substances” products from the market would “deplete” farmers’ ability to protect their crops.40Low Yield II,” CropLife Europe, March 2020. Archived December 1, 2021. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog. The report also stated that “the socio-economic impact of this depletion has received much less attention than the environmental, biodiversity and health impacts of pesticides.” 

Low Yield II was the second stage of a report from Steward Redqueen published by CropLife Europe, titled Low Yield Report.41Low Yield Report,” CropLife Europe, July 2016. Archived December 1, 2021. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog. A scientist named as a co-author of each report received a PhD from Netherlands-based Wageningen University & Research. Two reviewers of the reports were based at the university.

In April 2021, CropLife Europe said that new regulations designed to make the process of approving pesticides in the EU more transparent would present “a big logistical challenge,” and that CropLife Europe had “committed significant resources to ensuring that the transition to the new system is as smooth and inclusive as possible for our stakeholders.”42POLITICO EU Influence: Green wave — Vaccine comms lessons — New pesticides regime,” Politico Europe, April 2, 2021. Archived November 30, 2021, Archive URL: https://archive.ph/wip/8JwI3 43REGULATION (EU) 2019/1381 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL,European Commission. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

On May 25, 2021, three days before the European Parliament was due to vote on the Motion for Resolution for the extension of the approval periods for several active substances including Sumitomo’s flumioxazin, CropLife Europe sent members of the Parliament’s Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) Committee a position paper backing the renewal of flumioxazin. CropLife Europe wrote that “the extension of the approval period for these substances is not due to any scientific concern,” and stated that not extending the approval period would be “taking away solutions from EU growers and farmers.”44“ENVI Committee’s objection to the extension of approval periods for active substances- flumioxazine,” CropLife Europe, May 25, 2021. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

In July 2021, the European Commission’s in-house science service, the Joint Research Center, published an analysis predicting that targets to cut back on chemical pesticides and fertilizers in the EU Farm to Fork and Biodiversity strategies could cause a 20 percent reduction in agricultural greenhouse gas emissions.45Barreiro Hurle, J., Bogonos, M., Himics, M., Hristov, J., Perez Dominguez, I., Sahoo, A., Salputra, G., Weiss, F., Baldoni, E. and Elleby, C. “Modelling environmental and climate ambition in the agricultural sector with the CAPRI model,Publications Office of the European Union. Archived November 11, 2021. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

CropLife responded that the sector “continues to lack good data around the choices involved in making [sustainability goals] happen” and proposed commissioning an impact assessment on the pesticide and fertilizer reduction targets within Farm to Fork from Wageningen University.46Green agri goals achievable but risk being undermined by carbon leakage,” EURACTIV, August 24, 2021. Archived on November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/r47A9  

In October 2021, Wageningen University published its report on the impact of the Farm to Fork and Biodiversity strategies. A university announcement of the report’s release stated that a “probable consequence” of the policies would be “that the yields of agricultural crops will decline,” and that the decline in yield could lead to price increases, fewer European exports and “more imports of agricultural products from outside Europe.” The announcement acknowledged that “Researchers of Wageningen University & Research have calculated this in a study commissioned by CropLife Europe and CropLife International with involvement of other stakeholders in the food supply chain.”47Green Deal probably leads to lower agricultural yields,” Wageningen University & Research, October 12, 2021. Archived October 26, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/rgFyH 

In October 2021, CropLife Europe sponsored and supported a “scientific dialogue” with European media company EURACTIV titled “Farm To Fork: What the Analysis and Data Tell Us.” Johan Bremmer, a senior researcher in plant health and market intelligence at Wageningen University who was involved with the report, spoke on the panel.48Farm to Fork: What the Analysis and Data Tell Us,” EURACTIV, October 12, 2021. Archived November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/9ZCoO 

Industry group COPA-COGECA also emailed Members of the European Parliament stating that Wageningen University was “finalising an impact assessment on the Farm to Fork,” which they believed members of the Parliament should take into account during upcoming votes on the policy.49Email shared with DeSmog by source in the European Parliament, 2021.

On October 12, 2021, COPA-COGECA also signed a joint letter with other agribusinesses which stated that pursuing the Farm to Fork objectives presented challenges which had not been taken into account, suggesting that a study by Wageningen University would present a comprehensive assessment on the impact of Farm to Fork measures. The signatories, which included CropLife Europe and Fertilizers Europe, also stated that “with innovation and further support at the forefront of EU agricultural policy, farmers will continue to produce in an even more sustainable manner.”50Farm to Fork – It is time to listen to the data,” CropLife Europe, October 12, 2021.
Archived October 19, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/IQEDG
 

A 2021 paid Twitter ad by CropLife Europe stated that the Farm to Fork Strategy would “significantly decrease food production in the EU, Negatively impact EU farmers’ revenues, [and] cost EU citizens more in their weekly food shop while exporting the EU’s carbon footprint to other countries.”51European Commission targets for #EUFarm2Fork will :Significantly decrease food production in the EU, Negatively impact EU farmers’ revenues, Cost EU citizens more in their weekly food shop,” Tweet by @CropLifeEU, October 13, 2021. Retrieved from Twitter.com. Archived October 15, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/IS53S

Lobbying

According to the EU Transparency Register, CropLife spent between €600,000 – €699,999 on lobbying in 2019 and 2020.52European Crop Protection Association,” EU Transparency Register. Archived November 11, 2020. Archive.fo URL: https://archive.fo/G6OWL CropLife Europe has held 24 meetings with commissioners, members of their cabinets or directors-general of the European Commission between December 1 ,2014 and August 19, 2020.53European Crop Protection Association Meetings with European Commission,” European Crop Protection Association. Retrieved from DocumentCloud. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog. The group’s lobbying interests are listed as: Agriculture and Rural Development, Business and Industry, Competition, Consumers, Customs, Enlargement, Environment, Food Safety, Institutional affairs, Public Health, Research and innovation, Taxation and Trade.54CropLife Europe Transparency Register profile,” European Commission, Archived on November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/G6OWL 

In December 2020, CropLife Europe disagreed with the proposed reformation of the EU comitology system.55Comitology Reform Threatens Innovation,” CropLife Europe. December 3, 2020. Archived February 20, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/7P2BH According to the EU Comitology Register, the EU comitology system is the “set of procedures, including meetings of representative committees, that give EU countries a say in implementing acts.”56Comitology Register,” European Commission. Archived November 1, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/r4sfg

CropLife Europe signed a joint statement alongside COPA-COGECA and other agribusiness groups that represent  manufacturers of animal medicines, vaccines and other animal health products in Europe. The statement said that the proposed changes would “make the processes for product authorisations more complex, lengthy and less predictable.”57Joint Statement: Comitology Reform Threatening Innovation,” AnimalHealth Europe, March 17, 2021. Archived November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/8IslF 

The statement added:

“The proposal after amendments by the European Parliament will revert the logic from currently ‘approve when safe’ to ‘approve only when popular’. The Parliament’s amendments would enable a minority of Member States to block the authorisations of products, even if their safety is confirmed by the risk assessment agencies. This would make authorisations of certain products de facto impossible and would undermine science-based decision-making processes.”58Joint Statement: Comitology Reform Threatening Innovation,” AnimalHealth Europe, March 17, 2021. Archived November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/8IslF

As of November 2021, CropLife Europe had held four meetings with Commissioners and Members of their Cabinets in the European Commission of Agriculture and the Green Deal since the beginning of the year. In addition, CropLife Europe had held five meetings with Commissioners and Members of their Cabinets in the European Commission of Agriculture and Health. According to the European Transparency Register, these meetings were related to the Farm to Fork Strategy, the European Green Deal and sustainable food systems.59Meetings,” European Commission. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

In 2020, CropLife spent between €25,000 – €49,999 on the services of Fleishman Hillard, a political consulting group registered in the European Union.60Fleishman Hillard Transparency Register,” European Commission, Archived November 30, 2021, Archive URL: ​​https://archive.ph/KhdEa 

According to the EU Transparency Register, ECPA received no funding from the EU institutions during the 2018-2019 or 2019-2020 fiscal years. CropLife Europe’s website doesn’t say how much funding it receives from its own members.61CropLife Europe Transparency Register profile,” European Commission, Archived on
November 30, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/G6OWL

Funding

According to the EU Transparency Register, ECPA received no funding from the EU institutions during the 2018/19 financial year. CropLife Europe’s website doesn’t say how much funding it receives from members. [9]

Affiliations

CropLife Europe has seven corporate full members: Adama, BASF, Bayer, Corteva, FMC, Syngenta and UPL.62Our Network,” European Crop Protection Association. Archived November 11, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/GbKte

Its website lists 24 full members associations, and 15 small-medium enterprise (SME) members It also has eight associate member organizations, including the UK’s Crop Protection Association.63Our Network,” European Crop Protection Association. Archived November 11, 2020. Archive.fo URL: https://archive.fo/GbKte

CropLife Europe is a member of CropLife International, the European Chemical Industry Council (Cefic), the European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing and the Agri-Food Chain Coalition.64European Crop Protection Association,” EU Transparency Register. Archived November 11, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/G6OWL

In 2014, ECPA partnered with COPA-COGECA and agricultural association Asaja to launch a photo exhibition on the new Common Agricultural Policy 2014-2020.65Framing the future priorities of agriculture,” European Crop Protection Association. March 24, 2014. Archived November 11, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/cW68R

Croplife Europe is part of the Agrifood Chain Coalition, a joint initiative founded in 2014 that represents 12 leading agribusiness industry associations, including Fertilizers Europe and COPA-COGECA.66Members,” Agri-food Chain Coalition. Archived November 29, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.fo/pNFSE

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