Jim Hoggan and DeSmogBlog on The Tyee

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Be sure to pop on over to The Tyee this morning, to read the front page coverage of the DeSmogBlog. It’s a great piece resulting from a conversation that Jim Hoggan had with David Beers on June 13, 2006, talking about the PR industry, climate change, and the DeSmogBlog, among other things. You can listen to the actual audio interview here.

One great highlight, talking about why the scientific consensus isn’t reflected in the news media:

[That] is a testament to the power of public relations. Most people have heard it said that you shouldn’t believe everything you read in the newspaper. Well, let me tell you, if you’ve spent your time with PR people, you’d feel that very, very strongly. Most public relations people spend far more time on a story than a reporter can. And many of those stories, particularly as they relate to climate change, are manufactured, basically. There is actually a group of people who are out there trying to confuse the public about climate change, and they are very skilful at it. These people are good communications people.

The Tyee is a great source of forward thinking online journalism, based right here in Vancouver. Their site is also home to a buzzing community of people who comment on the pieces they write, so take a moment to check out the commentary as well… and maybe even contribute yourself.

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