DeSmog

Double Dipping Pat Michaels Told to Choose Sides

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Bravo to the Ranoake Times for this editorial on the “Virginia State Climatologist” Pat Michaels.

It has recently come to public attention that Michaels’ title is somewhat ceremonial and dates back to 1980. The Ranoake Times points out that Michaels seems to have two paymasters: the University of Virginia (which holds the paperwork on his state appointment) and the energy industry financiers that pay him consulting fees as he wanders about the country quibbling about climate change.

The title of State Climatologist, and Michaels position as a UVa professor, seem to give him credibility, while the money from industry might be taken to suggest that he is a well-paid corporate apologist. The Times suggests that he clear up the issue by foresaking further payments from one of those two masters.

Willingly? We think not.

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