Ill winds passed during Congressional hot-air debate

on

An article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, a leading academic newspaper, suggested Congress was treading on dangerous territory recently in discussing “the climatic effects of dinosaur farts,” given members’ own reputations “for producing hot air.”

Members quizzed four scientists who had helped oversee a report issued last week by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a UN panel. It began seriously enough with an introduction by Susan Soloman, a senior scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, who said global warming is unequivocal with a better than 90 per cent likelihood people are mostly responsible.

The discussions started to deteriorate, however, when Bert Rorabacher, a California Republican and former speechwriter for President Ronald Reagan, took issue with the IPCC’s finding of human blame, suggesting “dinosaur flatulence” might be the culprit.

Related Posts

on

Campaigners warn Brussels is poised to water down — or fatally delay — bold pesticide reduction targets.

Campaigners warn Brussels is poised to water down — or fatally delay — bold pesticide reduction targets.
on

TC Energy’s upgrade of its GTN XPress pipeline would result in a huge increase in methane gas volumes to the region. But it would undermine climate laws already on the books.

TC Energy’s upgrade of its GTN XPress pipeline would result in a huge increase in methane gas volumes to the region. But it would undermine climate laws already on the books.
Analysis
on

After a decade of losing hundreds of billions of dollars, the shale oil industry is finally making money — and running out of oil.

After a decade of losing hundreds of billions of dollars, the shale oil industry is finally making money — and running out of oil.
on

Emergency moves to end energy dependence on Russia represent a victory for the gas lobby’s plans to lock Europe’s biggest economy into the global market for liquefied natural gas, campaigners warn.

Emergency moves to end energy dependence on Russia represent a victory for the gas lobby’s plans to lock Europe’s biggest economy into the global market for liquefied natural gas, campaigners warn.
Series: Gas Lock-in