Long-awaited report shows continued rise in carbon emissions in U.S.

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Greenhouse-gas emissions will grow nearly as fast through the next decade as they did the previous decade, says the long-delayed United States Climate Action Report prepared for the UN. That means emissions will increase 11 per cent in 2012 from 2002 versus 11.6 per cent the previous decade.

A Bush spokeswoman said the report shows “the president’s portfolio of actions addressing climate change and his unparalleled financial commitments are working.”

But David W. Conover, who directed the administration’s Climate Change Technology Program until February 2006 and is now counsel to the National Commission on Energy Policy, said Bush has supported “mandatory limits” on carbon emissions.

“When he announced his voluntary greenhouse-gas intensity reduction goal in 2002, he said it would be re-evaluated in light of scientific developments. The science now clearly calls for a mandatory program that establishes a price for greenhouse-gas emissions.”

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