Gore kick starts sweeping program to slash U.S. carbon emissions

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Former Vice President Al Gore has launched a three-year, $300 million campaign calling for the U.S. to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, linking the effort with other historic endeavors like stopping fascism in Europe, overcoming segregation and putting the first man on the moon.

The bi-partisan bid features advertisements showing such political opponents as Rev. Al Sharpton and Pat Robertson, and Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and former Republican Speaker Newt Gingrich, burying the hatchet to combat climate catastrophe.

Some of the money for the campaign comes from Gore himself, including his personal profits from the book and movie ”An Inconvenient Truth,” a $750,000 award from his share of the Nobel Peace Prize and a personal matching gift.

”When politicians hear the American people calling loud and clear for change, they’ll listen,” Gore said in a statement. The former Tennessee senator and 2000 presidential candidate will be holding a climate-change training session April 4-6 in Montreal; several DeSmogBlog writers will be in attendance.

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