Syncrude Guilty in Duck Deaths

authordefault
on

Syncrude was convicted today of provincial and federal charges for the deaths of 1,600 ducks that got sucked into the slime in the company’s tar sands tailing pond in April 2008.

The company is now liable to fines of up to $800,000 and company officers face jail time, but a date for sentencing has yet to be set and no one believes that either level of government will throw the book at Canadian oil executives.

Syncrude had argued that it was operating its toxic waste dump with provincial and federal permits and that any conviction would render a continuation of the tar sands industry impossible. The judge wasn’t buying. He noted that Syncrude has crews dedicated to deterring birds from landing in its oily sludge, but observed that the crews only work Monday to Thursday. Apparently, the judge took as unreasonable Syncrude’s apparent optimism that migratory birds would take the weekend off.

Related Posts

on

Industry leaders attending a recent B.C. conference said local climate commitments will help them sell fossil fuels overseas.

Industry leaders attending a recent B.C. conference said local climate commitments will help them sell fossil fuels overseas.
Analysis
on

Keeping them means homes will use gas for heating too, explains Rice University professor Daniel Cohan.

Keeping them means homes will use gas for heating too, explains Rice University professor Daniel Cohan.
on

Party activists “ashamed” to learn of the contribution from the North Yorkshire biomass company.

Party activists “ashamed” to learn of the contribution from the North Yorkshire biomass company.
on

After endorsing Davante Lewis in the state’s latest Public Service Commission election, Louisiana Democratic Party leaders accepted $90,000 from the utilities overseen by the commission, ultimately throwing the party’s weight behind Lewis’s pro-industry opponent.

After endorsing Davante Lewis in the state’s latest Public Service Commission election, Louisiana Democratic Party leaders accepted $90,000 from the utilities overseen by the commission, ultimately throwing the party’s weight behind Lewis’s pro-industry opponent.