Pentagon Releases New Clean Energy Strategy

Pentagon Releases New Clean Energy Strategy
on

The U.S. Department of Defense has released a new strategy for how the U.S. military will address growing concerns over energy consumption. The military remains the single largest consumer of energy in the world, and accounts for 1% of total consumption in the United States. As concerns continue to mount over oil prices and the instability of oil-rich countries in the Middle East, the Pentagon is looking for new methods to continue to meet the energy demands of the military.

The U.S. military currently relies on fossil fuels for almost all of their energy needs, spending more than $13 billion annually just on fuel. Military operations accounted for 121 million barrels of oil alone, which does not include the amount used for domestic activities such as military housing operations and transports. But the Department of Defense has known for years that their current path is not sustainable, and raised the alarm over peak oil long before the U.S. Department of Energy. Their new report shows that they are actively working to switch to renewable energy sources, and away from dirty oil sourced from unstable parts of the globe.

From the report:

To protect the Nation and our interests across this wide spectrum of challenges, the United States will need a broad portfolio of military capabilities with maximum versatility. America’s armed forces will have to be as adaptable and agile as they are lethal and robust. They will have to be capable of projecting and sustaining military force and humanitarian assistance in collaboration with allies and partners around the world.

To build and sustain this 21st century military force, particularly in an era of fiscal duress, the Department of Defense must use its resources wisely, and that includes energy resources. Almost every military capability requires energy of some kind, and, as a result, the Department of Defense, as an institution, is one of the single largest consumers of fuel in the world. Nonetheless, the Department tends to treat energy as a commodity that will always be readily available, regardless of the strategic, operational, and tactical costs. Today, those costs can too often be measured in lives lost guarding and moving fuel across the battlefield. In the future, adversaries, including those armed with precision weapons, may be even more capable of targeting military supplies.

At the same time, energy security is important to national security. While the Department is a significant consumer of energy, it only accounts for about one percent of the energy all Americans use. The cost of America’s national energy consumption, particularly of oil, is too high, both in the billions of dollars the Nation sends overseas and in the geostrategic consequences. The Department has an opportunity to reduce these costs, both in terms of real spending reductions and in leading the way for the nation.

The Pentagon has actually been on the front lines in the battle over climate change in the United States for more than a decade. During the Clinton administration, the Pentagon actively worked with scientists to monitor sea ice levels via top secret satellite images. This program was shut down shortly after President Bush took office, but was re-authorized after President Obama was sworn in.

Since at least 2004, the Pentagon has warned the government that abrupt, intense climate catastrophes could play out if the government took no actions, and the Pentagon actually had plans in place for how to deal with sudden disasters. They have consistently ranked global climate change as a “destabilizing force” that would have serious impacts on our national security.

Demonstrating that they aren’t just all talk on climate change, the Pentagon and U.S. military have been working on converting entire fleets of Navy vessels to run on fuel created by algae. They are also working with scientists to develop other biofuels and renewable energy sources to help power the military. Military leaders hope that within the next 10 years, more than half of the energy needs of the military will be met by renewable sources of energy.

Pentagon Releases New Clean Energy Strategy

Farron Cousins is the executive editor of The Trial Lawyer magazine, and his articles have appeared on The Huffington Post, Alternet, and The Progressive Magazine. He has worked for the Ring of Fire radio program with hosts Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Mike Papantonio, and Sam Seder since August 2004, and is currently the co-host and producer of the program. He also currently serves as the co-host of Ring of Fire on Free Speech TV, a daily program airing nightly at 8:30pm eastern. Farron received his bachelor's degree in Political Science from the University of West Florida in 2005 and became a member of American MENSA in 2009.  Follow him on Twitter @farronbalanced.

Related Posts

on

A new report catalogues 15,896 federal and state violations from more than 100 U.S. Chamber of Commerce members, including major fossil fuel companies.

A new report catalogues 15,896 federal and state violations from more than 100 U.S. Chamber of Commerce members, including major fossil fuel companies.
on

“Most companies and financial institutions with the greatest ability to halt deforestation are doing little or nothing,” said Niki Mardas, Executive Director at Global Canopy, which conducted the research.

“Most companies and financial institutions with the greatest ability to halt deforestation are doing little or nothing,” said Niki Mardas, Executive Director at Global Canopy, which conducted the research.
Analysis
on

Two research psychologists analyze the all-too-familiar aspects of climate science denial found in the blockbuster new film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence.

Two research psychologists analyze the all-too-familiar aspects of climate science denial found in the blockbuster new film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence.
on

An Oregon State University study of almost 3 million births in Texas found mothers living less than a mile from drilling sites were more likely to experience higher blood pressure and other potentially dangerous health conditions.

An Oregon State University study of almost 3 million births in Texas found mothers living less than a mile from drilling sites were more likely to experience higher blood pressure and other potentially dangerous health conditions.