Marking Up the Alberta Government's $30,000 Keystone XL Ad

Marking Up the Alberta Government's $30,000 Keystone XL Ad
on

This is a guest post by Heather Libby.

If you’re a regular reader of the Sunday New York Times, you might have noticed a half-page ad in the A section promoting the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline last weekend. Paid for by the Alberta government with $30,000 of taxpayer funds, the text-heavy ad asserted several reasons why President Obama should approve the project.

Their primary argument? This is “the choice of reason”.

Putting aside the fact that their word selection suggests those who oppose the pipeline are illogical or unreasonable; the ad says “some still argue Keystone should be decided on emotion rather than science and fact about Canada’s responsibly developed oil sands resource”.

We completely agree. Here are a few scientific facts it forgot to mention:

And the list goes on, full of reasonable concerns that the Alberta government would rather you not ponder.

Check out our copy of the ad below (click to embiggen) to see a few more suggested edits to Alberta’s assertions. 

Marking Up the Alberta Government's $30,000 Keystone XL Ad

Related Posts

on

Matthew Lesh will be joining the Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA), a free market think tank which played a significant role in advocating for a "hard" Brexit and has criticised the government's approach to climate action as expensive and ineffective.

Matthew Lesh will be joining the Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA), a free market think tank which played a significant role in advocating for a "hard" Brexit and has criticised the government's approach to climate action as expensive and ineffective.
on

Since Monday, activists have racked up 585 arrests at protests in Washington, D.C., while pushing the President to declare a climate emergency ahead of international climate negotiations.

Since Monday, activists have racked up 585 arrests at protests in Washington, D.C., while pushing the President to declare a climate emergency ahead of international climate negotiations.
on

A new report finds that half of Canada’s oil and gas jobs could disappear by 2030 as the country presses on with a clean energy transition. But the federal and provincial governments are not doing enough to prepare workers for the change

A new report finds that half of Canada’s oil and gas jobs could disappear by 2030 as the country presses on with a clean energy transition. But the federal and provincial governments are not doing enough to prepare workers for the change
on

Responding to the analysis, Phil MacDonald, chief operating officer of Ember, said this was “exactly the kind of research that the UK government should be doing before it makes a decision on funding BECCS”. 

Responding to the analysis, Phil MacDonald, chief operating officer of Ember, said this was “exactly the kind of research that the UK government should be doing before it makes a decision on funding BECCS”.