Anti-Fracking Campaigners Lose Legal Challenge Over Cuadrilla’s Lancashire Shale Gas Site

Anti-Fracking Campaigners Lose Legal Challenge Over Cuadrilla’s Lancashire Shale Gas Site
on

Protesters in Lancashire have finally found out the result of a judicial review into the government’s decision to push ahead with shale gas exploration in Lancashire, despite the local council voting against it. Ruth Hayhurst from Drill or Drop has the story.

A community group and an anti-fracking campaigner have lost their legal challenge against the Communities’ Secretary over the way he granted permission for fracking at a site in Lancashire.

Sir Ian Dove, sitting at the Royal Courts of Justice in London this morning dismissed the case by Preston New Road Action Group and Gayzer Frackman.

This clears the way for Cuadrilla to drill, frack and test up to four wells at its Preston New Road site at Little Plumpton near Blackpool.

It is the final stage in the company’s planning battle, which began in June 2015, when Lancashire County Council refused permission for the site because of its impact on noise and visual amenity.

The Communities Secretary, Sajid Javid, granted planning consent in October last year, following the recommendation of the inspector at a 19-day public inquiry.

Preston New Road Action Group challenged the decision, saying Mr Javid had misunderstood or misapplied local and national planning policy in approving the fracking scheme.

Campaigner, Gayzer Frackman, from Lytham, argued that the minister’s decision failed to consider climate change and gaps in regulations to protect public health.

Cuadrilla began site work at Preston New Road on 5 January 2017 and is expected to begin drilling during the three months between April and June 2017.

Another Cuadrilla site, at Roseacre Wood, was also refused permission by the council and is the subject of a separate legal challenge. Mr Javid said he was minded to grant approval for this site, despite the planning inspector’s recommendation to refuse because of its impact on highway safety.

The minister said he would reopen the public inquiry to give Cuadrilla another chance to explain how it could resolve traffic problems. That decision has been challenged by Roseacre resident, Jules Burton. A court hearing is expected in the summer.

Get Weekly News Updates

Anti-Fracking Campaigners Lose Legal Challenge Over Cuadrilla’s Lancashire Shale Gas Site

Related Posts

Analysis
on

The government still contains four ministers who criticised “government-subsidised green technology” back in 2012, but one of them seems to have changed his mind about state intervention since then, and there are some new environmentally-friendly faces around too.

The government still contains four ministers who criticised “government-subsidised green technology” back in 2012, but one of them seems to have changed his mind about state intervention since then, and there are some new environmentally-friendly faces around too.
on

Campaigners have criticised Captain Ian Finley, a UK resident who has represented the Cook Islands at the International Maritime Organization since 2006, for consistently defending industry interests.

Campaigners have criticised Captain Ian Finley, a UK resident who has represented the Cook Islands at the International Maritime Organization since 2006, for consistently defending industry interests.
on

The union dubbed plans to shift away from fossil-fuelled heating “utterly absurd”, a statement one union member called “disappointing”.

The union dubbed plans to shift away from fossil-fuelled heating “utterly absurd”, a statement one union member called “disappointing”.
on

Dolphins killed during Ida’s storm surge are a reminder of how vulnerable Louisiana's marine life is to climate change. And locals worry a controversial river diversion project to increase the state’s marshland could make things even worse.

Dolphins killed during Ida’s storm surge are a reminder of how vulnerable Louisiana's marine life is to climate change. And locals worry a controversial river diversion project to increase the state’s marshland could make things even worse.