First Nations LNG Alliance

First Nations LNG Alliance

Background

The First Nations LNG Alliance describes itself as a “collective of First Nations who are participating in, and supportive of, sustainable and responsible LNG development” in British Columbia, Canada.”About,First Nations LNG Alliance. Archived May 3, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/G9w83

“First Nations” refers to the Indigenous peoples of Canada whose historic lands are located south of the Arctic Circle.”First Nations,” Facing History and Ourselves. Accessed June 24, 2022.

The group FNLNG was incorporated in B.C. as the First Nations Alliance Society in December 2015.”FIRST NATION LNG ALLIANCE SOCIETY. Business number: 792082323,” OrgBook BC. Accessed May 4, 2022. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

The First Nations LNG Alliance lists several goals in its constitution, according to corporate documents filed in B.C:

  • To provide balanced information to First Nations about the LNG industry and its opportunities for their
    people and communities;
  • To be the voice of First Nation leaders for sustainable LNG development;
  • To promote constructive and affirmative dialogue amongst First Nation communities in regards to the
    consideration of LNG opportunities;
  • To advocate collectively to leverage opportunities for First Nations in relationships with government
    and industry;
  • To communicate First Nations messages directly to First Nation audiences;
  • To enhance collective capacity to work together from a First Nation training and employment
    perspective;
  • To work collaboratively with the LNG industry;
  • To create a forum where environmental issues, including environmental monitoring can be prioritized
    for First Nations;
  • To administer funding for environmental projects on behalf of First Nations; and
  • To do all such other things as are incidental and ancillary to the attainment of the foregoing purposes
    and the exercise of the powers of the Society.

Karen Ogen-Toews, CEO of theFirst Nations LNG Alliance, reportedly formed the organization to unite “all the bands in B.C. who have signed [partnership] agreements for LNG development.”British Columbia Oil & Gas Report, 2015. Retrieved from Issuu. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

“I’m creating a FN LNG alliance to communicate as much information as possible about gas pipelines, with an emphasis on environmental standards. The key to making decisions, especially in the north, is having information,” Ogen-Toews told B.C. Oil and Gas Report magazine in 2015.British Columbia Oil & Gas Report, 2015. Retrieved from Issuu. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Ogen-Toews is also a member”STAFF,”First Nations LNG Alliance. Archived March 20. 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/uNaVz of the Resource Works Society, a group that “communicates with British Columbians about the importance of the province’s resource sectors to their personal well-being.””Mission,” Resource Works.Archived May 3, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/0Zctr and sits on the Resource Works Advisory Council.”The Resource Works Advisory Council,” Resource Works. Archived May 3, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/YJDbk

According to documents in a Freedom of Information requestFOI Request – IRR-2018-85291,” British Columbia. Page 6 of 60. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog. regarding the involvement of the First Nations LNG Alliance in a Joint Engagement Report with the Province of British Columbia, part of the Alliance’s mandate included a research partnership with the University of British Columbia and the MacDonald Laurier Institute (MLI). The Ottawa-based MLI has been described as a right-wing think tank.”Macdonald-Laurier Institute,” Corporate Mapping Project. Accessed May 2022. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Stance on Climate Change

April 28, 2022

The First Nations LNG Alliance shared a graphic from the pro-oil organization Canada Action claiming that “natural gas and other fossil fuels being with us for a long, long time”:”The International Energy Agency (@IEA) sees natural gas and other fossil fuels being with us for a long, long time[…]” Tweet by user “@FNLNGAlliance,” April 28, 2022. Archived .png on file at DeSmog.

June 2021

In May 2021, First Nations LNG chair Crystal Smith made a presentation on liquefied natural gas and the First Nations Climate Initiative (FNCI) during the online Canada-China LNG Investment Forum, which was hosted by the Canadian Embassy in Beijing.”First Nations messages to China on LNG,” First Nations LNG Alliance, Jun 1, 2021. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/Wg7s7

During the presentation, Smith promoted LNG produced in Canada as an alternative to coal burned in China, and suggested a partnership:

“We see climate change as a global issue that requires actions that are relevant on a global scale, as well as here at home.

“The Lax Kw’alaams, Metlakatla, Nisga’a and Haisla initiated the FNCI because our communities are interested in LNG development as a means for alleviating poverty, and are concerned about the real signs of climate-change impacts in our territories.

“FNCI is working with governments . . . other First Nations and other non-governmental groups to develop climate-change policies that simultaneously reduce greenhouse gas emissions and strengthen First Nations’ economic self-determination.

“This includes the development of net-zero LNG as a transition fuel and the development of a low-carbon economy.

“China is the world’s largest importer of natural gas. With your goals to achieve net zero by 2060, and our ability to provide net-zero LNG, we see opportunity for partnership.

“We are playing a leadership role in climate-smart development in Canada, and we want to partner with countries like China, because helping you reduce your GHG emissions helps the world fight climate change.

“The more we replace LNG for the types of coal burned in China, with net-zero LNG produced in Canada, we think we can. And we want to partner with you to make this happen.”

The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) has described the FNCI as “expected to increase Indigenous participation in major project development through collaborative relationships between industry and government and meaningful engagement.” CAPP notes that FNCI was set to receive C$1 million in federal funding.Holly Quan. “Federal funding for Indigenous projects and climate initiatives,” Context: Energy Examined (CAPP publication), March 23, 2021. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/8v50b

“It is critical that Indigenous groups have the capacity to fully participate in resource development, and we are happy to see the announcement of federal funding to support this important relationship with industry,” said Tim McMillan, president and CEO of CAPP.

October 2019

In an October 2019 episode of The Crownsman podcast, then-chair of the First Nations LNG Alliance Dan George said:”Leading by Example in First Nations Communities – Chief Dan George,” The Crownsman, October 18, 2019. Archived .mp4 on file at DeSmog.

“I think the global market is huge and I believe in what it does to global warming. If we’re going to sell to China, we can drop their greenhouse gases in half, which it’ll bring up BC’s actual greenhouse gas is a bit, but globally, it’ll knock knock it down a huge amount. And I look at both sides of the picture. Pros and cons. And an especially in the global industry right now with global warming and stuff, China’s still burning a lot of coal. And if we change that to natural gas, we could cut their greenhouse gases in half, which is huge for the whole world, not just Canada, for the world.”

Funding

In his October 2019 interview with The Crownsman podcast, Chief Dan George confirmed that the First Nations LNG Alliance was an “advocacy group.” He also noted that the group received funding from the provincial government:”Leading by Example in First Nations Communities – Chief Dan George,” The Crownsman. Archived .mp4 on file at DeSmog.

“We’ve been working closely with Trans-Canada, which is now TC Energy. So they’ve just changed their name lately and we also work with the B.C. government and they help fund our organization. So and we bring out positive the information out for them and help them where they’re having troubles along the line. We try and be the advocacy group and and help the the other First Nations and get them involved …. and do the right thing for their people.”

George noted later in the podcast that the group worked “in conjunction with the B.C. government on promoting LNG.” He added that part of his work included promoting First Nations support of the LNG industry at industry events in other provinces:

“As part of our First Nation LNG alliance, that’s what we do is advocate all the good things that is happening to our communities and why we’re doing it for our communities and all the good stuff that happened. So as an advocacy group, same with in Calgary, I speak at lots of energy events in Calgary and they’re always saying, Well, we never hear nothing good from B.C., so they always ask us to come and speak and we can reinforce to all of the big energy leaders that are in Calgary that we there is First Nations that support the LNG industry and the oil industry.

“But if you really look at the oil industry, everything we do is attached to the oil industry. If we drive a vehicle, we’re attached to the oil industry. A lot of the clothes that we wear is part of the oil industry. So there’s just no way to get around it. And I just can’t see why some people are totally against it.”

Discussing his own community of Burns Lake, George outlined some of the agreements for the area.”Leading by Example in First Nations Communities – Chief Dan George,” The Crownsman, October 18, 2019. Archived .mp4 on file at DeSmog.

“We have an agreement with TC Energy now – used to be Trans Canada, but they just change your name to TC Energy,” George told The Crownsman.

“So we do have an agreement with them on yearly benefits. All right, FID, we got a lump sum money and once the gas starts flowing, then we’ll get a yearly supplement from them. We also got PBA from provincial government, you know, provincial impact benefits agreement. So we have also done that. And I’m also part of Carrier Sekani Tribal Council, and we’ve negotiated beyond just the PBA’s with the provincial government. We have a confidentiality agreement with the province right now, so I can’t say nothing about it. But within the next few months, the province should be bringing this out and it’s just huge and mind boggling what we’ve done for our communities on LNG.”

Government Funding

The Major Projects Management Office (MPMO) is mentioned as a previous funder of the First Nations LNG Alliance, according to materials released as part of a Freedom of Information request.”FOI Request – IRR-2018-84639,” British Columbia (Page 99 of 155). Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Key Documents

Key People

Staff

Name 2020 2021 2022 Description
Karen Ogen-Toews Y Y Y CEO
Pearl Morgan   Y Y Virtual Executive Assistant
Judy Desjarlais       Diversity & Inclusion Outreach Worker”Judy Desjarlais,” LinkedIn. Accessed May 2022. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.
Lynn Parker       Diversity & Inclusion Outreach Worker”Lynn Parker,” LinkedIn. Accessed May 2022, Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Karen Ogen-Toews

Karen Ogen-Toews is CEO of the First Nations LNG Alliance. She is an elected council member of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation, as well as a former elected Chief of the nation.”Staff,First Nations LNG Alliance. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/PDvcZ

Ogen-Toews is also a board member of the Resource Works Society and the Resource Works coalition Task Force for Real Jobs, Real Recovery. The Task Force describes itself “a coalition of Canadians including industry associations, labour, Indigenous organizations” focused on natural resources development as the solution for economic recovery from COVID. “We’re well aware that there are those who see the answer as being to make natural resource jobs just go away. We do not believe this represents a solution for Canada,” its website reads.

Coalition supporters include a range of companies representing Canadian oil, gas, and forestry companies including:

  • Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors
  • Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers
  • Canadian Energy Pipelines Association
  • Canadian Fuels Association
  • First Nations LNG Alliance
  • Forest Products Association of Canada
  • Indigenous Resource Network
  • Mining Association of Canada
  • Petroleum Services Association of Canada (PSAC)
  • Saskatchewan Mining Association
  • Truck Loggers Association
  • And numerous other groups.

Pearl Morgan

Pearl Morgan runs Wolfpack Virtual Assistance out of Dallas, Texas, USA. First Nations LNG Alliance contracted with Morgan to provide virtual executive assistant support services. “Staff,First Nations LNG Alliance. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/PDvcZ

Judy Desjarlais

Judy Desjarlais is the president of Top Notch Oilfield Contracting. She has worked at the First Nations LNG Alliance on a part-time basis since March 2021, according to her LinkedIn profile. She is also on the advisory board to the Indigenous Resource Network, a group started in May 2020 to “provide a platform for Indigenous workers, business owners and leaders who support Indigenous engagement in the resource sector.””Judy Desjarlais,” LinkedIn. Accessed May 2022. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Lynn Parker

Lynn Parker worked with the First Nations LNG Alliance in 2021. At the time, she was the Councillor for Kitselas First Nation. As of May 2022 she is the First Nations liaison for the Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine.”Lynn Parker,” LinkedIn. Accessed May 2022, Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Parker previously worked as the community liaison officer for Kitselas First Nation. In this role she was the “contact between our nation and the different LNG proponents that are working towards putting either an LNG pipeline or a facility in or around our traditional territory.””Lynn Parker,” LinkedIn. Accessed May 2022, Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Board Members

Name 2016* 2017 2018* 2019* 2020 2021 2022 Role
Adele Gooding Y* Y Y* Y* Y Y   Secretary
Clifford White     Y* Y* Y Y Y Vice-Chair
Crystal Smith Y* Y Y* Y* Y Y Y Chair
Dan George Y* Y Y* Y* Y     Former Chair
Erwin Tom Y* Y Y*          
Eva Clayton           Y* Y Secretary
Heather Nooski       Y* Y Y Y  
John Jack       Y* Y Y Y Treasurer
Joseph Bevan Y* Y            
Ellen Lorentz           Y*    
Glenn Bennett*           Y*    
Ray Gerow*         Y*      
Judy Gerow*         Y*      
Robert Dennis*     Y*          
Amy-Ann Gauthier*     Y*          
*Year or individual not listed on available website or internet archive snapshots, however appears in official corporate filings

Adele Gooding

GM of Skin Tyee Nation, Adele Gooding served as secretary for the First Nations LNG Alliance. She has chaired the Northern First Nations Employment and Training orNFET (formerly the PTP ASEP – Pacific Trail Pipelines Aboriginal Skills Employment Partnership).”Board Members,” First Nations LNG Alliance. Archived May 13, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/6CsUA “Success Booklet June 6, 2017 Achievement Awards” (PDF), Industry Conector, June 6, 2017. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Clifford White

Clifford White is a First Nations Summit elected commissioner. He joined the board of the First Nations LNG Alliance in November 2018.White also served as a co-chair of the provincially-funded Tsimshian Roundtable, “which is a partnership of the six Tsimshian First Nations and LNG proponents in northwest B.C.””Gitxaala Chief Joins First Nations LNG Alliance,” CKPGToday.ca, November 5, 2018. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/LMEBX

In addition to representatives of the Tsimshian Alliance, the Roundtable included LNG project proponents Aurora LNG, BG Canada, LNG Canada, Pacific Northwest LNG, WCC LNG and Woodside LNG.”Gitxaala Chief Joins First Nations LNG Alliance,” CKPGToday.ca, November 5, 2018. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/LMEBX

 

White has served on several other boards, including the First Nations Advisory Committee of B.C. the Northern Nations Cooperative, the Prince Rupert Indigenous Housing Society and the New Relationship Trust Foundation.White is a member of the of the Nees Ma’Outa nation.”Staff,” BC Treaty Commission. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/Zh4mD

A video of Clifford White discussing resource projects was shared by LNG Canada as part of a “Let’s Talk LNG” series.”Let’s Talk LNG with Clifford White…” Facebook post by user LNG Canada, February 21, 2019. Archived .mp4 on file at DeSmog.

Crystal Smith

Crystal Smith is Chief Councillor for the Haisla Nation and chair of the First Nations LNG Alliance. “She has long been a champion of responsible development of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and associated pipelines in BC, and her Nation has numerous partnerships with developers in that field,” her profile on the Alliance website notes.”Board Members,” First Nations LNG Alliance. Archived May 3, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/Xeagu

Before becoming a Council member of the Haisla Nation, Smith interned at the mining company Rio Tinto Alcan from 2008 to 2009, according to her LinkedIn profile.”Crystal Smith,” LinkedIn. Accessed May 2022. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Smith was featured in an article by the Canadian Energy Centre that was critical of environmental activists opposed to a natural gas pipeline project in B.C.”Haisla Nation Chief Councillor Crystal Smith no stranger to double standard from activists,” EnergyNew Media, February 11, 2020. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/MkzOt

Dan George

Dan George is a former chair of the First Nations LNG Alliance, and Chief of the Burns Lake Band of the Ts’il Kaz Koh First Nation. His profile at the First Nations LNG Alliance notes that “prior to being elected by his band, Chief George worked in many resource-development sectors including oil, gas and forestry.””BOARD MEMBERS,” First Nations LNG Alliance. Archived March 15, 2020. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/VZuvY

George is a founding board member of the First Nations Housing and Infrastructure Council. Dan George,”First Nations Housing & Infrastructure Council. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/KXqgk

Erwin Tom

Erwin Tom is a Councillor for the Wet’suwet’en First Nation. According to his profile at the First Nations LNG Alliance, prior to this role he was a professional welder. Erwin’s experience includes working on natural gas pipelines in Cold Lake Alberta, in Edmonton, and across Northern B.C. He has sat on the board of the Burns Lake Native Development Corporation along with Dan George.”BLNDC board chooses directors,” Burns Lake District News, August 11, 2016. Archived May 5, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/wswTi

Eva Clayton

Eva Clayton, President of the Nisga’a Nation, is secretary of the First Nations LNG Alliance. “She is leading her nation’s major Ksi Lisims LNG project,” according to her profile on the Alliance website.”Board Members,First Nations LNG Alliance. Archived May 3, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/Xeagu

Clayton is the first woman to serve as president of the Nisga’a Nation or its predecessor organization, the Nisga’a Tribal Council. She is also the first woman of First Nations ancestry to be elected to the B.C. provincial legislature as MLA for the riding of Vancouver-Mt. Pleasant.(Press Release). “Ms. Eva Clayton Assumes Office of President of the NIsga’a Nation,” Nisga’a Lisims Government, November 17, 2016. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/r5R6H

When asked about her positions on liquid natural gas and mining, in 2016, Clayton said:”Eva Clayton elected first female president of Nisga’a Lisims Government,” CBC News, November 8, 2016. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/a6yRf

“I hope to see – I understand the various positions – but I don’t want to see the Nisga’a Nation putting all of its apples in one basket.

“It’s important for us to take a look at moneymakers, sustain government.

“That could be utilizing renewable resources: wind power, geothermal, just to name off a few. And to build up our local entrepreneurs.”

Heather Nooski

Heather Nooski is an elected councillor of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation. She “sees LNG-related revenue as helping the Wet’suwet’en deliver its tactical pillars: health, education, housing, language, and governance.””Our newest board member: Heather Nooski,” First Nations LNG Alliance, July 29, 2019. Archived May 5, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/PaT9A

According to her LinkedIn account, Nooskie is also vice president of the Burns Lake Native Development Corporation, where Erwin Tom and Dan George have also been directors.”Heather N.LinkedIn. Accessed May 2022. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

John Jack

John Jack is Councillor for the Huu-ay-aht First Nations and treasurer of the First Nations LNG Alliance. According to his Alliance profile, Jack was “responsible for the Huu-ay-aht involvement in the proposed Kwispaa LNG project with Steelhead LNG of Vancouver.””Board Members,First Nations LNG Alliance. Archived May 3, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/Xeagu

Joseph Bevan

Joseph Bevan is the former Chief of the Kitselas First Nation. He previously worked as a controller for Kalum Ventures Ltd.,”Joe Bevan,” LinkedIn. Accessed May 5, 2022. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog. a logging contractor in Northern B.C. that formed as the economic arm of the Kitsumkalum Band.”History,” Kalum Ventures LTD. Archived May 6, 022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/jz9Dv

The Kitselas First Nation signed a Pipeline Benefits Agreement with the provincial government in December 2014, and a Pipeline Project Agreement with Prince Rupert Gas Transmission in April 2015. Joe Bevan was one of five co-signatories to a Tsimshian Environmental Stewardship Authority (TESA) announced in July 2015.British Columbia Oil & Gas Report, 2015. Retrieved from Issuu. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Ellen Lorentz

Ellen Lorentz isis listed as a board member of the First Nations LNG Alliance in provincial corporate documents. She is a member of the council of the Ts’il Kaz Koh, also known as the Burns Lake Band, of the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council.”Ts’il Kaz Koh,” British Columbia Assembly of First Nations. Archived May 6, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/trURE

Glenn Bennett

Glenn Bennett was elected Chief Councillor of the Band Council of Kitselas First Nation in June 2019.”COUNCIL,” Kitselas. Archived May 6, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/wzcN1 He has appeared in a video by the LNG Canada natural gas project. Bennett is listed as a board member of the First Nations LNG Alliance in BC corporate documents”Kitselas First Nation: Working together to create opportunities,” LNG Canada, April 29, 2022. Archived .mp4 on file at DeSmog.

Ray Gerow

Ray Gerow is a cultural advisor with the Indigenous Partnerships Success Showcase, a group whose 2022 sponsors included Coastal Gaslink, the Modern Miracle Network, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, Resource Works, and numerous other resource development companies and proponents. The event‘s founder is Stewart Muir,Indigenous Partnerships Success Showcase homepage. Archived May 6, 2022. Archive URL:https://archive.ph/MoNao executive director of Resource Works.”Leadership,” Resource Works. Archived May 6, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/cL3v5

Gerow’s appointment was promoted by Resource Works on Facebook.”Join us in welcoming Ray Gerow…” Facebook post by user “Resource Works,” January 15, 2022. Archived .png on file at DeSmog.

Judy Gerow

Judy Gerow is a former Deputy Chief Councillor for the Kitselas First Nation.”About Kitselas Council,”Kitselas. Archived May 9, 2021. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/gQ3BI

Gerow appeared in a promotional video for LNG Canada.”‘The opportunity to become more self-sustaining and more self-reliant...’,” Facebook post by user “LNG Canada,” December 14, 2018. Archived .mp4 on file at DeSmog. At a 2019 presentation titled “Standing Up for LNG” at the British Columbia Natural Resource Forum, Andy Calitz, CEO of LNG Canada, thanked “Chief Joe Bevan and Deputy Chief Judy Gerow of the Kitselas, for acknowledging the deep partnerships LNG Canada has built with Indigenous people.””Standing Up For LNG: A Key Note Presentation by Andy Calitz, CEO of LNG Canada,” LNG Canada, January 24, 2019. Archived May 6, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/iwWed

Robert Dennis

Robert Dennis Sr. is Chief Councillor of the Huu-ay-aht First Nations. He has praised Steelhead LNG‘s approach to dealing with First Nations communities: “With Steelhead, we found a commonality, a willingness to make our project work. It’s been an incredible partnership. We’ve created a healthy balance of the economy and the environment,” he said in 2018.”First Nations LNG Alliance Newsletter 14 – Work with First Nations? First, ask,” First Nations LNG Alliance, May 18, 2018. Archived May 6, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/3HTRA

In a February 15, 2019 open letter,“Open Letter to Huu‐ay‐aht Citizens,” (PDF), Huu ay aht, February 15, 2019. Dennis and hereditary Chief Derek Peters said they were “deeply disappointed” when Steelhead LNG ceased operations on the Kwispaa LNG project.”First Nation ‘deeply disappointed’ after Steelhead LNG pulls out of Vancouver Island project,” CBC News, February 19, 2019. Archived May 6, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/Pe7vv

Amy-Ann Gauthier

Amy-Ann Gauthier is an Elder and former council member of the the Saulteau First Nations.“PROCEEDINGS AT HEARING: Topic-Specific Session Asserted or Established Aboriginal Rights and Treaty Rights” (PDF), Mainland Reporting Services Inc. January 17, 2014 Volume 23 Pages 1 to 294. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

Actions

May 26–27, 2022

First Nations LNG chair Crystal Smith was listed as a speakerSpeakers.” Indigenous Partnerships Success Showcase. Archived May 6, 2022. Archive URL:https://archive.ph/5jNqB at the 2022 Indigenous Partnerships Success Showcase, an event founded by Stuart Muier, the founder and executive director of Resource WorksHomepage, 2022 Indigenous Partnerships Success Showcase. Archived May 10, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/MoNao and sponsored by industry groups including the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), the Modern Miracle Network, Coastal GasLink, Enbridge, LNG Canada, TransMountain, and numerous others.”Sponsors.” Indigenous Partnerships Success Showcase. Archived May 6, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/ctkrJ

May 3, 2022

First Nations LNG Alliance Chair Crystal Smith was featured on RBC’s Disruptors podcast to discuss the “transformational benefits” of the Coastal Gaslink pipeline project for the Haisla nation.Jennifer Marron. “Indigenous ownership is critical to Canada’s clean energy transition,” RBC, May 3, 2022. Archived May 11, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/qJ8bF

May 2022

Crystal Smith and First Nation LNG Alliance CEO Karen Ogen-Toews were among the “strategic speakers” listed at the Canada Gas and LNG Exhibition and Conference in Vancouver, B.C.Canada Gas & LNG Exhibition and Conference Homepage. Archived May 9, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/iQqVL

Conference sponsors included Solaris Management Consultants, Enbridge, Fasken, Soletanche Bachy Canada, Government of Northwest Territories, Woodfibre LNG, and Air Canada.”Sponsors,” Canada Gas & LNG Exhibition and Conference. Archived May 9, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/ieYM3

April 29, 2022

The First Nations LNG Alliance tweeted media created by the Canadian Energy Centre claiming that the Woodfibre LNG facility would be “the cleanest LNG facility in the world.””[email protected] : Global demand for natural gas is soaring as nations look for lower emitting options to replace coal. […]” Tweet by user “@FFNLNGAlliance”, April 29, 2022. Archived .png on file at DeSmog.

February 2021

The First Nations LNG Alliance co-wrote a joint statement with the Indigenous Resource Network and the Indian Resource Council on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and Canadian House of Commons Bill C-15, with concerns that the legislation might limit natural resource development in Canada.”UNDRIP & Bill C-15,” Indigenous Resource Network. Archived May 30, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/HAAxg

“The uncertainty in the legislation makes it likely that it will be used as a legal strategy to delay and stymie resource development projects by groups that oppose extractive and other resource projects under any circumstances, even those where Indigenous nations are overwhelmingly in favour,” the letter claimed.

March 3, 2020

On the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers podcast Energy Examined, First Nations LNG Alliance chair Crystal Smith argued that “LNG and pipeline investments have helped reduce poverty, remove barriers and preserve traditional culture among the Haisla and their neighbours.””PODCAST: Pipelines, First Nations and reconciliation: Another view,Context (CAPP publication), March 3, 2020. Archived May 10, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/zFFlq

Energy Examined podcast host Tonya Zelinsky asked Smith [00:05:38]:

“I don’t want to harp on this issue when it comes to the Coastal GasLink, but it’s fair to say that LNG Canada needs the Coastal GasLink if it if it wants to move forward. So can you tell me how how the Haisla Nation will be affected if this pipeline is delayed even further or even just cancelled as a result of the public protests and blockades?”

Smith responded [00:06:01]:

“Well, for one, I do not believe that it’s going to be cancelled. But what it would mean if that were to happen would be a loss of opportunity. I mean, it would essentially go back to–so right now, within our Haisla territory are existing a few industrial partnerships, agreements. Honestly, it honestly makes me so emotional–”

Tonya: [00:06:38] Please take a moment.

Crystal [00:06:44] Our nation has worked so hard for this project to be successful because of the opportunities that it meant for our people, and as we were going through this work with LNG Canada, and they had announced their delay of 2015 or 16, they announced they were going to be delaying their F.I.D. It it was emotional then. And when we got to the F.I.D., it was such a joyous time in our community for people to realize that our lives were going to be different. […]”

Smith described as “frustrating” those protesting against the projects:

“[A] majority of those people don’t know what they’re out there for. And the issue, the root issue and the cause of all of this is something that can only be resolved by the Wet’suwet’en people, no one else. All the sensationalism around it is actually fueling more of a divide within that community, within family, within friends.”

Tonya [00:09:45] “Do you think–and I don’t I don’t want you to feel like you have to speculate on what people are thinking, but I mean, does it seem to you, like some people are taking advantage of this situation to advance other agendas?”

Crystal [00:10:01] “I truly do believe that. I really do. For a while, our community has been aware of outside entities providing financial assistance to organizations that would essentially organize these types of events in order to halt them, in order to stop projects. So there are outside entities fuelling all of this.”

August 22, 2017

Messages released as part of a Freedom of Information request outlined the First Nations LNG Alliance’s involvement in a Joint Engagement Report with the British Columbia provincial government. In an email co-signed by the First Nations LNG Alliance, First Nations Limited Partnership, and BC LNG Alliance, the groups requested a “joint meeting” with Michelle Mungall, Minister of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, and Scott Fraser, Minister of Indigenous Reconciliation.”FOI Request – IRR-2018-84639,” British Columbia. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

“The LNG Industry in BC is working towards a sustainable and environmentally and socially responsible LNG industry that will benefit British Columbians by adding value to BC’s natural gas,” stated the letter. “Liquefying natural gas creates skilled jobs and business opportunities in BC communities and the additional tax revenues from the industry will help the province invest in programs and services that increase the quality of life for all British Columbians.”

The report highlighted three LNG facility projects that “will contribute nearly $3 billion of new revenue to BC’s government annually.”

The letter notes that the LNG Alliance’s members include LNG Canada – a consortium of Shell and partner companies– WCC LNG (ExxonMobil), Kitimat LNG (Chevron Canada and Woodside Energy), Tilbury LNG (FortisC), Woodfibre LNG, Grassy Point LNG (Woodside Energy), and AltaGAs.”FOI Request – IRR-2018-84639,” British Columbia. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

2017

The First Nations LNG Alliance partnered with the B.C. Ministry of Energy, Mines, and Petroleum Resources (EMPR) in the fall of 2017 “to conduct five regional engagement sessions with local First Nations to gather perspectives” on LNG development. Together, FNLNG and EMPR co-authored the resulting Joint Engagement Report “to further advance recommendations for the future of LNG projects and ongoing engagement with First Nations.”“Province of British Columbia and First Nations LNG Alliance Joint Engagement Report” (PDF), First Nations LNG and Province of British Columbia. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

According to the report’s executive summary, “discussions with local First Nations in each of the
five regional engagement sessions have shown that a high degree of support for LNG projects in British Columbia remains. In fact, many First Nations representatives raised the need to push the remaining projects over the finish line in order for the communities to achieve the benefits they negotiated with the provincial government and industry proponents.”

The engagements were facilitated by former First Nations LNG chair Dan George and took place in the following B.C. locations:

  • Prince George, September 27, 2017 
  • Smithers, October 2, 2017 
  • Fort St. John,October 16, 2017 
  • Vancouver, October 25, 2017 
  • Terrace, October 26, 2017 

In its conclusion, the report suggested First Nations groups were frustrated with LNG project delays:

“There have been many positive impacts to First Nation communities related to LNG development, prior to any construction. Much capacity has been created due to these proposed projects; however, expectations have also been raised. Now, First Nation leaders are trying to deal with their constituents’ frustration because of the delays or cancellation of these projects. These missed or delayed opportunities are negatively impacting First Nations communities throughout the province.”

Additional information including a draft itinerary of the Regional Engagement Sessions were made available in 2018 in response to a Freedom of Information Request published online at the Government of B.C.”FOI Request – IRR-2018-84639,” British Columbia. Archived .pdf on file at DeSmog.

The First Nations LNG Alliance lists the following projects and organizations on its website:First Nations LNG Alliance Homepage. Archived May 3, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/Imrqt

  • Cedar LNG
  • Coastal Gaslink
  • Kitimat LNG
    • Chevron
    • Woodside
  • LNG Canada
  • Woodfibre LNG
  • Ksi Lisims LNG

Contact & Address

The First Nations LNG Alliance lists the following address on its website:”Contact,” First Nations LNG Alliance. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/3MPFb

First Nations LNG Alliance
c/o Haisla Nation
PO Box 1101
Haisla BC VOT2B0

This address, which was listed as the group’s delivery and mailing address in its 2016 through 2021 annual reports filed in British Columbia, corresponds to the address of the law firm Ratcliff, LLP,:”Contact Us,” Ratcliff. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/9SysC a law firm with experience serving First Nations and Indigenous clientsAboriginal Law,Ratcliff. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL:https://archive.ph/RnBRo in a number of areas including economic development involving natural resources.”First Nations Business & Economic Development,” Ratcliff. Archived May 4, 2022. Archive URL: https://archive.ph/VfwPO

500 – 221 Esplanade W
North Vancouver BC V7M 3J3

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